Integrations: A Surprisingly Unique Text Editor and Secure Email

A little down time can pique all manner of curiosities, especially at this time of year. As folks start reeling in the list of promises they’ll probably never keep, workflow changes are usually in the picture. I'm no different, and much as I'd like to pretend I am. I sometimes like to look in on projects I have either passed by, or promised to come back to. The following are a couple of apps that fit that profile. Canary Mail is an alternative secure email client for iOS, and macOS, while Typora is a cross platform, markdown text editor. The thematic connection between the two is the interesting integrations they both have, Canary with PGP, and Typora with Pandoc.

Alter Secure Mail Client that Isn’t Ugly As Hell

Secure Alternative Email Client
The rapidly improving Canary Mail is worth a look if you need a security focused email client

Everybody hates their email client. It’s a difficult problem to solve, but it remains a necessary evil, so we have no choice. Some time last year some time I was invited to participate in the Beta for Canary Mail . At the time I opened it up, thought it looked promising but remained under-developed, then I mostly forgot about it.

I thought of again when I found myself in a discussion about the terrible options for secure email, so I took another look. I was immediately surprised at the pace of development, there is a lot to like. Such rapid development is not always desirable, in the context of email clients you only have to look at the plague of problems faced by Airmail to see that sometimes slowly but surely is a better approach. 1 As for security features, you will find any number of hideous looking, obscure email clients featuring strong encryption, but it is usually shoehorned in as an afterthought in otherwise well designed apps. In fact, believe it or not, security is one of the more compelling reasons to stick with Apple Mail — if you know what you are doing to make it work that is.

This is where Canary stacks up well. If you’re looking for a secure alternative email client, Canary is balanced and feature rich, with PGP encryption built in using the MIT and key base servers. Obviously including encryption is not all that interesting in itself, but making it user friendly is. The best part is how responsive the developers are, early adopters have been actively engaged in the support forum, and rewarded with the fast adoption of features. I can’t remember ever seeing a project work so well, the result is an app that keeps getting better. It still has some raw edges, but if you want to look at something that is bucking the trend of data grabbing applications, it is worth a look. At the very least, it is an app to keep an eye on. Canary is available on both macOS, and iOS. It is now also part of the excellent Setapp collection

Integrating Pandoc with a Text Editor

Pandoc Markdown Text Editor
Typora's features include Pandoc integration with the GUI, and a Markdown outliner

There is no shortage of well designed, minimal text editors for the Mac — or for the iPad for that matter. If you’re a developer with your heart set on building such an app, you really need something different. For example, as an expression of typography focused, opinionated design, iA Writer is stunning. Ulysses, on the other hand, has somehow found the sweet spot between text editor and word processor to carve out an unlikely niche.

While there is a decided trend towards the plain text and distraction free aesthetic, making a mark in the text editor space is only going to get harder. And yet, there is still room for innovation where more specialised writing is concerned. Particularly for academic writing, there is only so far you can go before minimalism starts requiring too many workarounds for the supplementary parts of your writing. If you’re on board with plain text, this is often where Pandoc comes in. Chances are, if there is something you can’t do with a text editor, Pandoc can do it.

This is why I have been intrigued by Typora, a text editor that uses Pandoc for export and conversion. The abilities of Pandoc go way beyond what Typora is currently doing with it, although it has some other interesting features, and not everyone needs the full compliment of super powers. Notably, the editor previews the output in what Typora calls a real live preview. The result is more of a what you see is what you get workflow, much closer to a rich text editor. The app feels like what you might get if you combined Lightpaper’s  live preview with the syntax minimising aspects of Ulysses. It also has a touch of Folding Text about it, as it tracks headings in a Markdown outliner that tucks behind the main editor.

Typora is full of nice little touches. I can see it appealing to writers who want a clean interface, and enjoy the frictionless experience of writing with Markdown, but don’t want to look at the syntax at all. Ulysses will take you a fair way down that road, but Typora goes that little bit further. It might also appeal if you’re stuck working between Windows and Mac, or even Linux. Typora is one of only a few markdown text editors that is genuinely cross platform.  I know a lot of academic writers in that situation.

The Mac version is currently free while it’s in Beta. 2  You can download it directly

  1. Like everyone, I really like what Airmail wants to be, but remain frustrated by how buggy it is
  2. It has been in Beta for some time, but the app is definitely still in active development.