Secure Email Client Canary Mail Joins Setapp

Canary Mail Setapp.png

Subscription App Store, Setapp, is one of the first things I recommend new Mac new users these days. From inception, the apps included in a membership were always impressive. Setapp can meet the software needs of a large majority of Mac users, and the collection is constantly improving. The latest improvement is the addition of excellent, security focused email client Canary Mail.

Setapp’s other email clients don’t work for me. Boxy looks pretty, but it’s designed for Gmail, and I gave that vice up some time ago. Unibox is a contact focused client, which might be useful if your workflow is focused on particular people. but doesn’t work for a curmudgeon like myself.

Canary’s thing is security. It makes encryption more user friendly by integrating with the MIT and Keybase servers. End-to-end encryption is automated when both sender and recipient are Canary users, or can be initiated manually when sending to other clients. It is probably worth reiterating the point in my post yesterday, about the recently discovered PGP and S/MIME exploit. Using encryption is simply a good habit, and something an app like Canary can help with. However, nobody should be relying on email for genuinely sensitive information. If you need serous encryption for messaging, use Signal. But, securing the content of your mail is not the only security concern with email clients.

Protect yourself from Email tracking with Canary

A feature I really appreciate in Canary is the ability to block email trackers. With all the talk of web tracking, I’m surprised I don’t see more about the tracking that goes on in email clients. While an extension of what happens on the web at large, email tracking is potentially worse for violating privacy. A 2017 paper from Princeton University researchers revealed the extent of the problem.

About 29% of emails leak the user’s email address to at least one third party when the email is opened, and about 19% of senders sent at least one email that had such a leak. The majority of these leaks (62%) are intentional. If the leaked email address is associated with a tracking cookie, as it would be in many webmail clients, the privacy risk to users is greatly amplified. Since a tracking cookie can be shared with traditional web trackers, email address can allow those trackers to link tracking profiles from before and after a user clears their cookies. If a user reads their email on multiple devices, trackers can use that address as an identifier to link tracking data cross-device

It goes on, if you want to read the whole paper you can find it here.

Beyond Image Tracking

The most common form of tracking is via invisible pixels. This is why I advocate for switching off the ‘load remote images’ setting in whatever email client you use. The problem is, blocking images is a blunt tool, it can render some email unreadable. Canary is smart about blocking only the tracker pixel, so it doesn’t ruin the design of html email. Using Canary in conjunction with something like 1Blocker can mitigate many of the concerns raised about leaking your personal data via the seemingly innocent act of opening a newsletter.

I am pleased to see Canary turn up on Setapp. I struggle to see how the proliferation of single-app subscriptions is sustainable in the long run. The outrage might have died down, but the fatigue is starting set in. Macpaw’s setup is smart, it shows in the quality of the software they are offering. I cannot recommend it enough. Especially when a 50% discount for students means over a hundred apps are available for US$5 a month.

If you have no need for the full suite, Canary Mail is also available direct from the Appstore on both macOS, and iOS.

One Year of Micro.blog and The Micro Appademic

Micro Blog Appademic Feed

Micro.blog has reached its first anniversary. I have been planning to cover the budding platform in detail for sometime. Eventually, I may even get there. In the meantime, in addition to setting up my own micro blog, I have added a feed to this site for the network. Although I haven’t quite figured how I will delimit the content, at the very least link posts will be pointed that way.

This is a fascinating project. Whether you’re looking to ditch the ever more toxic proprietary social networks, or simply gain control over the content you post online. That goes for anybody. It dovetails perfectly with the Domain of One’s Own initiative that Profhacker and others advocate.

What Manton has achieved with the platform in such a short period is remarkable. Here are the highlights from his One year of Micro.blog post.

If you haven’t checked out Micro.blog lately, here are some things that happened just in the last few months:

  • We launched a microcast called Micro Monday to feature members of the community. Each week, a different Micro.blog user joins Jean MacDonald for a quick interview about how they blog and what they like about Micro.blog.
  • To make it easier for anyone to create a short podcast, Wavelength lets you record, edit, and publish a microcast from your iPhone. You can also upload MP3s from the web and serve a podcast at your own domain name.
  • Sunlit is our iOS app for posting photos and discovering photos and new Micro.blog users to follow. It’s a free app with more control over publishing stories with photos, text, and different filters.
  • There’s a new theme for hosted microblogs called Marfa. We use this theme on Micro Monday.
  • Medium was added as a cross-posting option. Post to your own blog and Micro.blog will automatically send a copy to Medium.
  • Expanded the Discover section on the web and in the native apps to highlight photos, podcasts, and more. It’s a great place to see what
  • people are posting about or find new people to follow.

That is some list. For my own two cents,  there are a lot of ways the platform can improve, and no doubt will.  If Micro.blog suffers from anything, it is the relative lack of documentation for how genuinely open it is. There is a middle ground for all the tinkerers,  that I suspect will eventually be filled in. The kind of people who aren't web developers, but neither are they unable to cobble somnething together on their own that isn't a WordPress site.  At the same time, what has been acheived so far is impressive.

The easiest way to get started is to roll with Micro.blog’s own hosting, but as alluded to above the open nature of the platform means there are a plethora of ways to get started. I have setup a site using the wonderfully minimal Chalk Template for Jekyll. But bear mind, if you do something like that you will likely not have use of the Micro.blog apps for the social features. Which is why I find myself grappling with obscure ways to implement Micropub protocol for a self hosted Jekyll site. If I manage to crack that problem, you’ll know.

If you’ve always wanted to start a blog, but didn’t know how. Micro.blog might be what you never knew you always wanted.

Photo by James Pond on Unsplash

Overcast 4.2: The privacy update | Marco.org

This privacy focused update to the Overcast podcast player could hardly come at a better time. I have found Overcast a little frustrating at times. I might wonder about its popularity if I didn’t get how big a deal Marco is in Apple tech circles. However, the spirit of this update has prompted me to renew my subscription for another year. It might not have all the features I want, but it supports the features I need.

Castro has nailed podcast triage. The inbox feature of that app is almost enough to make me forget the things it is missing. If organising your podcasts is more important than the silence trimming trickery performed by Overcast or Pocket Casts, then definitely try Castro. Where it fails for me, it doesn’t appear to support chapters. That’s a deal breaker.

However, if Overcast implemented an inbox now, I would probably consider it game over. 1 I evaluate the privacy element of every app and every service I use to the point that it is fundamental.

Big data ruined the web, and I’m not going to help bring it to podcasts. Publishers already get enough from Apple to inform ad rates and make content decisions — they don’t need more data from my customers. Podcasting has thrived, grown, and made tons of money for tons of people under the current model for over a decade. We already have all the data we need.

With this update, Overcast has been elevated in my mind.

  1. And no, smart playlists do not adequately substitute. Trust me, I have tried.

Say Hello to 1Blocker X – 1Blocker

The makers of the popular Safari content blocker, 1Blocker recently released an new version of their iOS app.  You can obviously read the details via the link. In addition to refreshing the codebase, with 1Blocker X they have managed to implement a workaround for the hard limit of 50,000 blockers imposed by iOS.

Soon after releasing 1Blocker in 2015 and adding more features (Whitelist, Hide Elements, Make HTTPS, iCloud sync, etc.) and extending our rule sets, we found out that we are about to hit the limit of total number of rules allowed for a Safari content blocker extension. Apple set the limit at 50K rules, and we were already at 49K. We wanted to block more unwanted content and keep adding more features, but were frustrated by the limit of 50K rules. The only solution to that problem is to create multiple extensions within 1Blocker that independently manage blocking in Safari. However, that requires rewriting the app to handle all these new extensions.

It says a lot that 50k isn’t nearly enough to control the dumpster fire created by the contemporary internet. Tracking users online has become so sophisticated that a content blocker isn’t about to stop it happening altogether. But, the least you can do is make it hard for would be trackers. Throw in protection from crypto miners, and other nefarious actors, or even improve the internet by blocking comments!  The introductory price of US$4.99 looks a bargain.

Last day for 50% Discount on 2Do — 5 March, 2018

With all the attention being lavished on Things 3, it's easy to forget there are other excellent task managers out there. One such app is the wonderfully powerful, and endlessly customisable 2Do. In my humble opinion, 2Do is one of the highlights in the Setapp collection, but it’s also available as a standalone purchase via the App Store. If you have been thinking of picking up a copy, there is no time like the present. The developer has been running a sale, which ends today.

Available on the App Store, for iOS (Universal) and macOS

A Case Study in Phishing | MacSparky

A Case Study in Phishing | MacSparky — While this is a great example of how sophisticated phishing scams can look on the surface, just beneath the veneer are all the crude signs that scream scam. Perhaps the crudest is how greedy these scammers are, you might think they’d look up the subscription prices before trying to ape them.

The first tool you need in fighting Spam is common sense. YouTube Red does not cost $149.99/month, and a simple search will tell you that. If there is any question, also take a closer look at the details. The sender lists their name as “App Store” but disclosing the actual email address; it’s “noreply11@fillappealform.com”. Does that really sound like an address Apple would send you to confirm a subscription? Also, it lists “Payment Method” as “By Card”, not the usual xxxx-xxxx-1234 you usually see. It also creates this sense of urgency, explaining I'm on a free trial but I will be charged $150 in just two days if I don't act. While I can see how this email may fool some people, on the barest scrutiny, it starts looking shady.

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App Highlights: Best of the Mac in 2017

Best Macos Apps 2017 Setapp

Welcome back productivity nerds. This is part two of a gripping trilogy on software highlights from 2017. In part one, I catalogued some of my favourite iPad apps from last year. The meat between the iOS device sandwich, is of course the Mac. So here we go again.

Before we begin, if you’re interested a number of the apps on this list come with Setapp. That is something I’ve written enough about recently, so if you'd like to read more about Setapp,  you can  do so here. The apps in question are clearly marked with the appropriate links. Remember, these are just the highlights.

Back to the Mac

Things 3

Best Mac Apps 2017 Things 3
Things 3 has everything I need in a task manager.

 

The barometer I use for organisational tools is how much time it takes to manage them. That I spend very little time in the app itself, is a good indication Things is doing what it’s supposed to. The way Things handles the inbox is better than any other task manager I have used. I don't feel like I am double handling tasks. I thought I might miss the automation of Todoist, but so far I haven't really, the email to Things feature is enough.

Scrivener 3

Best Mac Apps 2017 Scrivener 3
Scrivener's facelift, and feature upgrade improved an already excellent application

I still haven’t found the time to write this up properly, but I did give it a cursory post. While you can get lightweight versions of some features, there still nothing like Scrivener. This new version is a long way from the early skeuomorphic days. Now that the interface is so crisp, and clean, it looks every bit the modern Mac app. Further to the visual touches, a long list of new features have improved an already powerful piece of software. If you do any kind of serious long-form writing, and you’re still using a traditional word processor, I’m sorry but you’re mad. 1

Ulysses

Best Mac Apps 2017 Ulysses
Most of my day to day writing takes place in Ulysses

Ulysses also makes the charts across both platforms. I use Scrivener a little more on macOS. But as I mentioned in the iPad post, all other project based, long-form writing, and content for this blog is created in Ulysses. I now also use it for posting directly to WordPress, and I couldn’t be happier with how well that works. Setapp takes care of my Ulysses subscription on macOS, and iOS.

Highlights

Most of my reading, annotating, and editing of PDFs happens on the iPad now. I’m so used to doing that work with an Apple Pencil that marking up PDFs on a Mac can be frustrating. Despite that, there are occasions that demand more screen space, and sometime I need to extract a lot of text from a PDF. Highlights can extract highlighted text, and annotations in Markdown, which is something I cannot do on iOS — defintely not in markdown. 2 Now that DEVONthink handles all of my OCR needs, this is the only other PDF app I need on the Mac.

DEVONthink Pro Office

While coverage has focused on the iOS version, 2017 was also the year I went all in with DEVONthink on macOS. I once shared the superficial concerns of some prospective users, but even if i’d like to see the interface overhauled, I’m glad I got over myself. 3 DEVONthink is a heavyweight application, so getting the most from it takes time. The depth of functionality is perfectly suited to the archive, search, and retrieve workflows required of serious research, so that time is worth investing. I no longer have any trouble finding important documents. My records are organised with some sanity, and I know how, and where to find research I have spent considerable time gathering.

TaskPaper

Best Mac Apps 2017 Taskpaper
Taskpaper is part nerdy task manger, part super-powered outliner

I have known about TaskPaper for a long time, but never really used it properly. That changed last year. With TaskPaper’s plain text super powers, I have cobbled together something resembling a system for planning and tracking my reading, among other things. It might seem like overkill to be employing a form of task management on top of a dedicated task manager, but it helps my scattered mind no end to seperate the finer details. Setapp

Marked 2

Anyone working with text should have this in their kit. No matter what that work entails. Marked is a kind of Swiss army knife for writers. If you are relentlessly obsessive about what you do with words, you will recognise a fellow traveller in this app. It even includes features to improve your writing. Anything I write about Marked risks underselling it. It’s worth a hell of a lot more than what it will cost you. Setapp

Spillo

Best Mac Apps 2017 Spillo
Spillo is the best macOS client for my favourite bookmarking service, Pinboard.in

I archive a lot of data in DEVONthink, but I don’t use it for bookmarks. Instead I use the perennial wonder machine, Pinboard.in for archiving web pages. Spillo is easily my favourite macOS client for pinboard. Minimal, and opinionated with just the right amount of nerdiness. It’s fully scriptable, and even has its own plugin SDK. Since setting up an Alfred workflow with Spillo, I get more use out of Pinboard than ever.

Being and Nerdiness

Tower

Until last year, I hadn’t done any programming for a long time. I still don’t, but I can at least lay claim to vandalising code in my attempts to learn how to. For my humble use of git as it is, Tower is more than I need. Then again, using such a wonderfully designed piece of software can only be helpful if I’m to learn things the right way. Working Copy on iOS is currently my favourite Git client on any platform, but this is a pretty close second. Things could change any day now.

Sublime Text with SFTP

Best Macos Apps 2017 Sublime
There is a reason Sublime is preferred by so many developers

I agonised over choosing a text editor for learning development skills. With growing support out there for Visual Studio, I gave it a test run. If easier to configure, ultimately I didn’t like working in it. I tried Atom, and liked the general feel, but I can’t yet benefit from its configurability — honestly it felt kind of slow. In the end, true to form, I landed where I started. Now that I have it set up properly, Sublime text has become one of my favourite applications. As for extensibility, the Sublime SFTP package is the best thirty bucks I have spent in some time.

Forklift

Another of the technical tools I require, this one has a lot of tricks. To call Forklift the best FTP client I know of would undersell it4. With a slick designed dual pane file browser, file syncing, drive mounting, keyboard kung fu, and all round excellence, these days it is always open on my Mac. Setapp

Super Duper!

The most deceptively simple looking app I own. Super Duper overcame a momentary rough patch to deliver an unbelievable improvement to an already excellent utility. With the advent of APFS, it now creates bootable snapshots. The scheduler works so efficiently, I hardly even notice. I can’t begin to express the peace of mind.

The Digital Cage

Timing

There was an intense time-tracking trend among a sub-section of nerds last year. Trust me, that’s not happening here. I find the idea of tracking every aspect of your life disturbing. I use this app in a much less pervasive way, for tracking writing projects. I gather data on how long it takes me to write certain things, so I can better understand deadlines. Whether self-imposed, or not. Timing makes this easy, as it can automatically capture time spent in particular applications. Setapp

Cardhop

A contacts app is not something that would ordinarily interest me, I have only humble contact management needs. Since contact syncing started to work properly, I have been happy to use the native contacts app and forget about it. I felt much the same way about calendars until I tried Fantastical. The Flexibits natural language engine is like magic, and sure enough they have put it to good use in Cardhop.

Utilities

Alfred

Spotlight can only take you so far. For keyboard warriors, an application launcher is mandatory. Beyond a long list of built in features, Alfred is an endlessly extensible, powerful automation tool. An active, and generous user community means there are workflows for just about anything, and help at hand if you want to hack together your own.

iMazing

This is one of those utilities I never knew I needed. It’s common knowledge iTunes is a mess. Apple’s answer is to remove things without replacing them. Whenever it seems I can no longer do something with an iOS device, the answer is iMazing. Setapp

1Blocker

I could have put this on the iOS list too. I published a post recently on how I use 1Blocker to keep me sane while using the internet. Whether you want to block ads or not, the web is often a shady place. Stopping yourself from being tracked might be a hopeless pursuit, but you can at least make it difficult. I’m happy knowing my computing resources aren’t being filched for crypto-mining. I’m also a control freak, so I’ll let through what I please thank you very much.

Radio Silence

For much the same reason as above. I prefer to know what’s dialling home. While incredibly powerful, Little Snitch is too noisy for my liking. Radio Silence is much more simple, and yet it still gives me the control I want. In short, this little firewall rules.

Bartender 3

Without this little utility, my menu bar would look insane. Version 3 was released a few months back. Instead of dropping beneath, the menu bar now toggles between your main utilities and whatever you choose to hide. A subtle, but worthwhile change. It works so well it will probably be sherlocked.

Making and Breaking

Pixelmator Pro

Best Mac Apps 2017 Pixelmator Pro
Pixelmator Pro is a powerful image editor that even a novice can understand

This is an aspirational app at the moment,  it’s probably overkill. My image editing needs a fairly simple, and most of it is done on the iPad. Especially now, with Affinity Photo on iPad Pro. However, Pixelmator has always been an app that I could grok easier than other image editors, so I picked this up in the hope that I could develop some chops. What little I have done with it so far, has been a pleasure.

Audio Hijack

Best Mac Apps 2017 Audio Hijack
If you need to capture audio on your Mac, Audio Hijack is as good as it gets

Another project yet to see the light of day led me to this audio marvel. If you have any cause for routing, or capturing audio on your Mac, this is how you do it. The modular, drag and drop, visual workflow, makes sense out of confusing audio chains. Along with all the built in audio processing, it even supports Audio Unit plugins.

  1. The idea of long-form writing seems to have taken on new meaning recently. To be clear, I’m referring to books, theses, and so on. For long blog posts, it might be overkill.
  2. Unless somebody knows an app that can do this?
  3. It could probably lose a few features
  4. Yes, yes SFTP. Of course.

App Highlights: Best of the iPad in 2017

Best Of The Ipad In 2017

Here come the lists, finally. I held off a little, given the ubiquity of listicles in the first few weeks of the year. That’s my excuse anyway. I considered revisiting the essentials list in its entirety, but decided to deliver something more concise with a take on the best iPad apps in 2017. Expect a more comprehensive resource when school’s back in below the equator. In the meantime, these are a few of the highlights from 2017, broken down by device. Starting with the iPad.

Breaking the Mac Habit

DEVONthink To Go

It might have started life as a companion, but DEVONthink to Go has helped break some of my Mac dependence over the past year. Even without some of the automated sorting the macOS app is known for, it houses a lot of neat tricks. Encrypted storage, intelligent search queries, url x-callback automation are some of the highlights. If you want to learn more about what it can do, I posted a detailed introduction here. The Appademic also happens to have five licenses up for grabs at the moment.

Working Copy

Only recently have I started to need tools like this. Now that I do, I can fully appreciate what an excellent piece of software this is. If learning the basics of Git is straightforward enough, it can just as easily be complicated by a messy client. Working Copy is easy to pickup, and a pleasure to use. It is now fully integrated with the Files app, supports drag and drop, and Markdown syntax highlighting . The excellent documentation means I fumble around in the dark a lot less. I have gone from thinking I had to be on a Mac to work with Git, to preferring my iPad so I can use this app.

Best Ipad Apps 2017 Working Copy
Working Copy is my favourite Git client on any platform

Ferrite

While music is well served, iOS is still under developed as a professional audio platform. It borders on silly that the very platform to popularise podcasts, still lags when it coms to creating them. Much of the technology required for the necessary audio routing already exists, but hasn’t yet been applied. Ferrite is both uniquely focused on voice, and wonderfully tuned for touch interaction. If you’re doing any kind of interview work, podcasting, or voice capture on iOS, this is where to do it.

Ferrite Best Ipad Apps 2017
Ferrite is the best audio editor for voice work on iOS

 

Peace of Mind

Things 3

This is cheating a little. I’ve really only been using Things for a couple of months. I tried to avoid the bandwagon, but trialing it on macOS convinced me it was a better solution for me than Todoist. Although there are features of Todoist I miss, in the end it was overkill for my needs. Things doesn’t require as much tuning, and gets out of my way more. I have a more detailed account on the differences between Todoist and Things on the way soon. It made the list, because despite not using it long, it has been a positive change. The less time I use in an app like this the better.

1Password

Sometimes software can take care of annoying details in a way that makes you forget how the most trivial things can become annoying. Agile Bits introduced an ingenious innovation into their apps last year that auto-copies information. It makes logging into apps easier, when they haven’t bothered adding generic password extension. Even better, it auto-copies one-time passwords to automatically populate two-factor logins.

Writing

Writers are spoilt for choice on iOS now. I have pointed out a number of times what a good writing tool the iPad is. The user experience encourages the kind of focus that writing depends on, in a way a Mac does not.

Ulysses

I’d like to be more of a purist with plain text, but I finally succumbed to the charms of this app. While I’m pleased to have Scrivener on iOS, I don’t like that it only syncs with Dropbox, and the development is a little asymmetric with macOS. The same is not true of Ulysses. Admittedly, I use the apps quite differently, and my thesis ultimately resides in Scrivener. All other project based writing, long-form, or anything for this site, it’s all in Ulysses now. It’s also worth adding I find the Ulysses WordPress integration works so well now that I no longer need Workflow to fill that roll. I get access to Ulysses on both macOS, and iOS as a Setapp subscriber.

 

Best Ipad Apps 2017 Ulysses
Ulysses has become my default writing app on iOS

iA Writer

For composing anything that I consider singular, or outside of any ongoing project. For short work, or external editing of files from DEVONthink, and even for writing email at times. I use iA Writer. Writing in a different app can be a little like a change of scenery, sometimes it works at breaking the valve. There are a lot of good text editors on iOS, but none of them can match iA Writer for minimalism and typographic design. If you’ve never written in a plain text editor before, this is your gateway drug.

Despite the Trolls

Apollo

Until this turned up, I had all but stopped using Reddit on iOS. Apollo has quickly gained popularity, and with good reason. It is the first app of its kind to have a truly native user experience. Built by a former Apple insider with meticulous attention to detail, it is now the only way use Reddit. In the developer’s own words, ’the goal was to envision what a Reddit app would look like if Apple themselves built it.’ He nailed it.

Best Ipad Apps 2017 Apollo
Apollo has become the only way I use Reddit

 

 

Mind Maps and Scribbles

MindNode 5

The recently released version 5 added a number of nice touches to an already excellent app. I tend to gravitate more towards outlining than mind mapping, but digital mind mapping is now better than it’s ever been. With the faster refresh rate on the iPad Pro, the experience is much more tactile and enjoyable. After flipping between different apps for structured mind mapping, I have happily settled on this for now.

Best Ipad Apps 2017 Mindnode 5
Subtle details in MindNode 5 have improved an already excellent app

 

Linea

I’m no artist, but sometimes a truly blank page is the best place for scribbling ideas. In fact, a purist take on mind mapping would reject a purpose built app. A blank page, and something to mark it with, are all you need. I used to use the free Paper app, by Fifty Three for this, which is still more than up to the job. Linea is a delightfully restrained app. Minimal, responsive, and easy to use. If I have something to scribble, this is where it happens.

Note-taking

MyScript Nebo

If you have an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil, Nebo ‘s  handwriting recognition and ink engine is as good as it gets. The rate of development is a little disappointing, no doubt because this app is something of a showcase for the technology that underpins it. The way I use it, the handwriting recognition matters more than having features you find in apps like GoodNotes and Notability. Most, if not all of the digital handwriting I do at the moment happens in Nebo.

Best Ipad Apps 2017 Nebo
Nebo's handwriting recognition is still the best available, it borders on magic that it understand my chicken scribble

Notebooks

I mention this in passing so often, it remains hard to categorise. I’m including it again for it under research, because ultimately that is how I use it. In reality, it’s a note-taking app first and foremost. Notebooks allows me to set the content as tasks, so if I have a project that requires a specific reading list I will add the documents to Notebooks and setup a reminder schedule. It means I can mark material off as I have gone through it, this feature makes it a unique app for research and study. I’ll admit this is a peculiar part of my workflow, as eventually I archive everything in DEVONthink anyway. Most people would only need one or the other, but I’m a weirdo like that.

Best Ipad Apps 2017 Notebooks
Notebooks is a powerful, and unique note-taking app with a touch of GTD

Filling the Gaps

Workflow

By now this is getting boring, but it honestly was one of the most important apps I used last year. Perhaps because I finally feel I have started to get the hang of it. There is a way to go before I can start making paginated workflows, but I’m getting more out of this app than ever. By now it is so essential that I’m starting to understand the obsession about its future. One can only hope Apple’s acquisition of Workflow — and it’s clearly brilliant developers — means the future of iOS automation is bright.

Copied

Again, this is not a revelation. However, I’m putting Copied on the list because of how much it holds things together. Drag and drop has replaced some of its functionality, but I still rely on it a lot. Apple’s continuity can be flaky at times, and the iCloud clipboard just stops working for no apparent reason. Copied’s merge templates, and other automation features are excellent.

Gladys

Yes, me too. I have tried a bunch of these shelf apps, it turns out this one is popular for a reason. At first I thought I wanted an app that supported multiple shelves, until I realised it would become another place gather unnecessary digital junk. It will no doubt be sherlocked eventually, but for now it does exactly what I need it to.

Scratching the Surface

The iPad has always been well covered for creative apps. Thinking of the best iPad apps 2017 produced,  a couple come to mind that could be considered milestones for iOS.

Affinity Photo

I haven’t yet scratched the surface of this app, what little I have done with it has blown my tiny mind. Every now and then we get pitched an app that will supposedly push the iPad from recreational device to serious professional machine. Notwithstanding that fact that such developments are generally incremental, Affinity Photo taps much further into the potential of the hardware. In ambition at least, it is a genuinely professional app to rival desktop software.

Best Ipad Apps 2017 Affinity Photo
Affinity Photo breaks new ground for professional software on iOS

 

BeatMaker 3

The iPad has always been a brilliant music device, even if it remains underrated. I’ve gathered a silly number of music apps for iPad Pro. That you can still pick up digital instruments for a fraction of the price they cost on desktop computers is too hard to ignore. While I could highlight any number of impressive debuts from last year, if the goal is to name just one that stood out, for me it was Beatmaker 3. Intua have built the kind of hybrid digital audio workstation that feels uniquely suited to iOS. It has its quirks, but this app is epic fun.

Best Ipad Apps 2017 Beatmaker
BeatMaker 3 was a highlight among the many wonderful music apps released on iOS in 2017

 

 

Safari Browser: Improving the Web with 1Blocker

best safari content blocker

Beyond the ruckus around content blockers to iOS, you will find plenty of legitimate reasons to employ them. Let’s face it, these days the internet is cesspool of malware masquerading as legitimate technology. Take one look at the doublespeak around intelligent tracking protection in Safari and you will get a sense of what is at stake. I won't delve into those arguments here. If you read this site regularly, you have a pretty good idea of where I stand.

No, this is not about tracking, but one of the internet’s other most beguiling annoyances. Since the advent of Webkit blocking, projects like Better by ind.ie have tried to work admirably at balancing the blocking of invasive web trackers, and other nefarious practices, with understanding the struggles of independent publishers.1 Yet, as the results are still opinionated the blocker decides what will be let through, and that is that. There is only one content blocker I know of that gives me the kind of control necessary to be considerate, while blocking out elements I'd rather not see. I’m talking about the dumpster fire of opinion found in most comments sections.

What I didn’t expect when I started using 1Blocker, was an interpretation of internet annoyances that dovetailed with my own. Out of the box 1Blocker blocks comments on websites. It’s not perfect, the mechanics of webkit blocking mean if you block comments, it blocks them everywhere. You’re guaranteed to find some of the most base, vulgar, and offensive baiting anywhere on the internet in comments sections. One way or another I would find myself reading comments, then trying to mitigate the ugly feelings I have about the world thereafter. Since installing 1Blocker , the internet hasn’t been nearly as irksome.

If you don’t already know, Webkit content blockers work differently to classic ad-blockers. Using something like uBlock Origin might give you the same results, but it won’t work on iOS, and it can’t offer the performance of a Webkit content blocker. In their own words,

While most other extensions block content by filtering elements of already downloaded page, 1Blocker uses native blocking technology to tell Safari in advance what should be blocked. This vastly improves efficiency and saves battery life.

Elements and Rules

There are places, albeit very few, where comments are still useful and engaging. Chances are, if you happen to frequent such a site, you may be amenable to adding it to the whitelist. Or if you would prefer to work the other way around, you can use 1Blocker’s hide element tool — which works on macOS and iOS — to block elements on a case by case basis. I have chosen the nuclear option, and not just because it defaults to no comments.

I’m using the example of comments, but internet annoyances don’t end there. 1Blocker recently started blocking crypto-mining scripts by default. If you’re happy digging in the inspector, you can build your own custom packages to block anything you want. You can only create rules on macOS, they will sync to iOS automatically.

best safari content blocker
1Blocker includes a powerful custom package builder that allows users more control of their browsing experience

I don’t run ads on this site, in fact I have been woefully inadequate at encouraging more support of the site. 1  However, there a numerous sites I frequent that include some form of relatively subtle advertising. I use the free Disconnect browser extension to visualise the trackers set by sites, if I’m happy the site is not doing anything nefarious I can whitelist it in 1Blocker. The result is an internet experience that doesn’t make me want to scratch my own eyes out.  As a considerable bonus,  it allows me to support people doing what I consider to be the right thing.

1Blocker is available on macOS, and has both a free and premium version on iOS

The Appademic is giving away 5 free copies of DEVONthink to Go for iOS. Find the details here

 

  1. Something I will have to address soon, if it is to live on ↩︎

 

iOS Giveaway: Five Licenses for DEVONthink to Go

Devonthink Ios Only.png

Closing out last year I took a good look at the merits of using DEVONthink to Go as an iOS only user. I am a fairly recent convert to DEVONthink more generally, but the more I use them, the more I understand their immense value.

As I prepare my own version of the indulgent listicles you see everywhere, I am reminded of the myriad ways I have integrated DEVONthink into my workflow. The thing that has surprised me most is the way DEVONthink has affected how I work on iOS. It has even solved a problem I suspect might resonate with a lot of other nerds, which is how to centralise your data if you’re an incessant app swapper. DEVONthink is so easy to get data in and out of, I simply keep everything there. 1  I recently had a brief twitter exchange that got me thinking about DEVONthink as an app silo. Seeing as I have this iOS giveaway for DEVONthink to Go, I thought I might also share a couple of quick thoughts on that

On the Question of App Silos

The way DEVONthink works on the Mac, makes this an easier question to answer on macOS. If putting everything into a database is a problem, you can use the indexing feature instead, and still take advantage of the search super powers. You data remains at large in the native file system. I intend to cover DEVONthink on macOS in the not too distant future, I will look at the pros and cons of taking this route then.

In the meantime, as that option is not available on iOS it might seem more cut and dry. I’m not so sure. This is a crude analogy, but in a sense the architecture of iOS makes it something of a modern day terminal client. Ordinarily, your data is always somewhere else. Even if you maxed out the storage option, keeping all of your data locally on an iPad is not only atypical, but seriously risky. Operating on those terms also tends to raise other considerations, especially concerning security.

Functionally, the question becomes how you access and interact with that data. The key for me is that DEVONthink doesn’t change the structure of your data, which is precisely why it’s not difficult to get it back out again should you ever want to. Although not the only problem, to my mind the most significant concern with app silos is storing your data in a proprietary format. Evernote is the most obvious example in this context.

Perhaps as cloud storage evolves, and Apple improves iOS through their APIs, we might eventually have the option on iOS to index files outside the database. Even then, I’m not sure I would bother when I get the considerable advantage of strong client side encryption with DEVONthink, but it would be a good problem to have. It is also with reiterating that DEVONthink's excellent integration with iOS Files, means entire folders can simply be dragged in and out of the app. In functional terms this makes DEVONthink completely different to what we normally consider an app silo. It's really not something you need to worry about.

Don’t get me wrong, I still think this is an important part of the equation for data storage. But, if like me, the data you manage is largely future proofed as plain text, or kept in universal file formats like PDF, then I feel you're safe. The more important question for me is how I can access that data, and what I can do with it. Especially if you are the kind of person who will secure that data either way. If there is a compromise with DEVONthink, I feel it is in your favour with search, security, and automation worth much more. No doubt it helps that I have a lot of faith in DEVON technologies as developers.

Get Yourself a Free Copy Of DEVONthink to Go for iOS

There is further good news on the DEVONthink front. Not only where the good people of DEVON Technologies kind enough to share my review on the Devonian Times blog, but they have also donated The Appademic 5 licenses to give away for DEVONthink to Go.

I want to keep this simple. If you want a chance to pick up a copy, signup for the mailing list. If you’re already on the list, you’re a chance. Incidentally, being on the mailing list means I will always include you if I have something to give away. If you want to signup and then unsubscribe, I have no problem with that, but don’t be concerned about spam — I have neither the desire, nor the resources to do anything of the sort.

 

Thank you to everybody who entered, this draw is now closed. However, from time to time developers of software I recommend will offer promotional licences, joining the maling list will put you in the draw permanently.

 


  1. At least, I keep a copy of everything