Rise of the machines: has technology evolved beyond our control? | The Guardian

This recent article from James Bridle does more to recommend him as one of the more insightful, and interesting writers on Technology at the moment. I linked to a post he wrote about disturbing algorithmic content on Youtube. I'm glad to a writer like this finding a platform to ask important questions in an accessible way.

Something strange has happened to our way of thinking – and as a result, even stranger things are happening to the world. We have come to believe that everything is computable and can be resolved by the application of new technologies. But these technologies are not neutral facilitators: they embody our politics and biases, they extend beyond the boundaries of nations and legal jurisdictions and increasingly exceed the understanding of even their creators. As a result, we understand less and less about the world as these powerful technologies assume more control over our everyday lives.

Between technological evangelism, and equally religious devotees, the more important dissenting voices and thoughtful critique become. Which is why I recommend picking up a copy of Bridle forthcoming book New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future

Find it on Book Depository or Amazon

Details on a New PGP Vulnerability | Schneier on Security

You might have seem some of the hullabaloo around the web about the discovery of a security flaw in PGP or S/MIME. From Bruce Schneier, the vulnerability is not in the encryption itself, rather the exploit is carried out in transit.

The vulnerability isn't with PGP or S/MIME itself, but in the way they interact with modern e-mail programs. You can see this in the two suggested short-term mitigations: “No decryption in the e-mail client,” and “disable HTML rendering.”

The suggested workaround is solid advice. Email has never been a sensible means for secure communication.

Why is anyone using encrypted e-mail anymore, anyway? Reliably and easily encrypting e-mail is an insurmountably hard problem for reasons having nothing to do with today's announcement. If you need to communicate securely, use Signal. If having Signal on your phone will arouse suspicion, use WhatsApp.

Show and Tell – Tuesday 8 May, 2018

The Appademic Show And Tell Links.jpg

An intermitant collection of concisely annotated, tech related links

We Know Where You Live

Palantir Knows Everything About You

The most emblematic paradox; it goes like this. Facebook knows everything about you, but Palantir knows more.

Cops Around the Country Can Now Unlock iPhones, Records Show | Motherboard

I know most people don’t expect the FBI will want to access their phone. To understand the situation, put the argument to yourself in reverse and you will soon realise the implications. Thankfully, these holes are usually filled in before long. Either way, use the strongest security you can by principle.

Google's File on You Is 10 Times Bigger Than Facebook's – Here's How to View It | Zero Hedge

Compared with most people I know, I'm pretty careful about the privacy of my data. I'm still scared to look at what Google has on me. By now, nobody should be surprised, and yet I wager you will be surprised. Look if you dare.

Stop Using 6-Digit iPhone Passcodes | Motherboard

Typically we won’t hear about cracking technology going underground for sometime, so forget the argument that you — being a law abiding citizen — needn’t worry about the police.

Idle At Work

The New Lesson Plan for Elementary School: Surviving the Internet – the Washington Post

This is more than I can say for a majority of the fully grown adults I spend my days avoiding

Susan, a 10-year-old in pink sneakers who likes YouTube and the mobile game “Piano Tiles 2,” quietly raised her hand. “I will make sure that I don’t tell nobody my personal stuff,” she said, “and be offline for at least two hours every night.”

Silicon Valley's Sixty-Year Love Affair With the Word “Tool”

Permit me a juvenile aside if you will, it seems we could update the old adage about what you eat.

“Is Curing Patients a Sustainable Business Model?” Goldman Sachs Analysts Ask | Ars Technica

For whatever reason, I know a lot of people struggle coming to terms with this very simple, but obvious contradiction in our economic system. This is about as clear an example as one could imagine.

Your Pretty Face Is Going to Sell | Open Space 

A brief investigation of commodified affect via YouTube, amusing.

What Else Floats on Water

Apple Sued an Independent iPhone Repair Shop Owner and Lost | Motherboard

I come across some gobsmacking equivocation when it comes to Apple. The idea that this behemoth is anything other than a halo bearing wonder of the modem world would undermine everything advocates want to believe about themselves. The truth is a little more uncomfortable.

“Apple is proving themselves to be the worldwide poster child of the Right to Repair movement,” Gay Gordon-Byrne, executive director of Repair.org, which is pushing for this legislation, told me. “They continue to make our case for us—suing legal repair providers, such as Henrik, lying to consumers about CPU performance throttling instead of battery replacements, and the coup de grace of hypocrisy—building products that are hard to repair and then proclaiming they care about the environment.”

Anyone wondering what right to repair would mean for the rest of the world might start here.

The specifics of Huseby’s case won’t matter for American repair shops, but that Apple continues to aggressively pursue a repair shop owner over 63 iPhone screens signals that Apple is not interested in changing its stance on independent repair, and that right to repair activists and independent repair companies should expect a long fight ahead of them: “I feel that this case was extremely important for them to win,” Huseby said.

Now Look Here

How Microsoft Helped Imprison a Man for ‘counterfeiting' Software It Gives Away for Free | TechCrunch

I’m out of words for this one. This is brutal from Microsoft, even if it should come as no surprise.

Stop Calling These Dark Design Patterns or Dark UX | These Are Simply asshole Designs

Whether you want to believe it or not, our economic system is built on obfuscation. These practices are deceitful, no question. At the same time, they paradoxically reveal a certain overlooked truth. I’ll leave it to you to work out what that is — in case you overlooked the first sentence.

Brutalist Design Is the Bad Influence We All Need

If you have any interest in design, you may like to read this. Aesthetics aside, there is a sociological argument hiding in here about pseudo-originality. I’ll leave you to find it.

The Disturbing High Modernism of Silicon Valley | Cal Newport

First time I’ve ever been remotely interested in something from this blog

No, Students Probably Aren't Blowing Their Student Loans on Bitcoin | the Chronicle of Higher Education How not to do research

Group Madness

Ex-Google Engineer Scraping YouTube to Pop Our Filter Bubbles | MIT

Chaslot, who worked at YouTube in 2011 and then at Google until 2013 (he claims he was fired for trying to give users more control over the algorithms that recommend content; neither Google nor YouTube addressed that contention in a response to a request for comment about this and other issues he has raised), figured this out by tracking YouTube’s suggestion algorithm. He tested his theory by building software that simulates the act of starting out watching one video on YouTube and then clicking on the recommended “Up next” video (which will also play automatically if you have YouTube’s autoplay feature turned on), over and over and over.

The New Lesson Plan for Elementary School: Surviving the Internet | Washington Post This is more than I can say for a majority of the fully grown adults I spend my days avoiding

Susan, a 10-year-old in pink sneakers who likes YouTube and the mobile game “Piano Tiles 2,” quietly raised her hand. “I will make sure that I don’t tell nobody my personal stuff,” she said, “and be offline for at least two hours every night.”

San Francisco's Bizarre Scooter War Shows How Tech Companies Ignore the Law | VICE

Literal disruption — and I mean, literally literal.

A Flaw-by-Flaw Guide to Facebook's New GDPR Privacy Changes | TechCrunch

No, it’s not about to end anytime soon

Facebook Removes 1.5 Billion Users From Protection of EU Privacy Law | Ars Technica

Either data is worth more than the tax breaks (which is likely) or to keep hold of both, a new level of tax dodging chicanery is required. Either way, Facebook is a grotesquely scaled version of a street huckster who gives you a dime while pinching your wallet from your pocket

Login With Facebook Data Hijacked by JavaScript Trackers – TechCrunch

In case you missed this. I recently heard a well known podcaster offering some thought on how it is relatively safe to use these single sign-on solutions. You know, Oauth is completely locked down; don’t be paranoid, and so on. So, anyway.

The abusive scripts were found on 434 of the top 1 million websites including cloud database provider MongoDB. That’s according to Steven Englehardt and his colleagues at Freedom To Tinker, which is hosted by Princeton’s Center For Information Technology Policy. I

The Many Deceptions of Mark Zuckerberg | Creative Good

Lies, damned lies, and Facebook.

Broaden Your Mind

Introduction · Front-End Developer Handbook 2018

Open source generosity of a kind. Nerds are largely a very generous cultural subset

And Now, For Something Completely Different

In Search of Photographic Treasure: Alfred G. Buckham | International Center of Photography

These photos are incredible.

A Robot Does the Impossible: Assembling an Ikea Chair Without Having a Meltdown

Closest thing to genuine artificial intelligence yet

 

Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash

Overcast 4.2: The privacy update | Marco.org

This privacy focused update to the Overcast podcast player could hardly come at a better time. I have found Overcast a little frustrating at times. I might wonder about its popularity if I didn’t get how big a deal Marco is in Apple tech circles. However, the spirit of this update has prompted me to renew my subscription for another year. It might not have all the features I want, but it supports the features I need.

Castro has nailed podcast triage. The inbox feature of that app is almost enough to make me forget the things it is missing. If organising your podcasts is more important than the silence trimming trickery performed by Overcast or Pocket Casts, then definitely try Castro. Where it fails for me, it doesn’t appear to support chapters. That’s a deal breaker.

However, if Overcast implemented an inbox now, I would probably consider it game over. 1 I evaluate the privacy element of every app and every service I use to the point that it is fundamental.

Big data ruined the web, and I’m not going to help bring it to podcasts. Publishers already get enough from Apple to inform ad rates and make content decisions — they don’t need more data from my customers. Podcasting has thrived, grown, and made tons of money for tons of people under the current model for over a decade. We already have all the data we need.

With this update, Overcast has been elevated in my mind.

  1. And no, smart playlists do not adequately substitute. Trust me, I have tried.

Thank you for making 10 years of GitHub possible | Github

Github has put together a nice timeline of achievements to celebrate their first decade in existence.

For 10 years, you’ve shared, tinkered, and built on GitHub from all around the world. Before we head into the next decade, we’ve collected some of our favorite moments and milestones—just a few of the ways you’ve pushed software forward.

I have written about the usefulness of GitHub for academic users in the past. The platform’s commitment to education is not only admirable, but I suspect a part of their success in general. If you’re a student, and you’re looking for a way to get into coding in any capacity — even if it is only a passing interest — the Github student package is more than worth claiming.

Show and Tell – 3rd April, 2018

Best Facebook Privacy Links.jpg

We Know Where You Live

The subheadings for this link gathering exercise might seem like nonsense. They are, it’s true, but not random nonsense. 1 If you recognise their origin, maybe you've also picked up how this particular Python title has taken on more meaning recently.

MoviePass CEO: ‘We Watch How You Drive From Home to the Movies'   Surely we're waking up to all this, right? Beware the ills of convenience

According to Media Play News, CEO Mitch Lowe told those at a business forum that the movie subscription service's app not only tracks your location, but follows you to and from the theater. “We watch how you drive from home to the movies,” he said, adding that “we watch where you go afterwards.” Not surprisingly, the company is hoping to understand customer habits and “build a night at the movies.”

How Widely Do Companies Share User Data? Here’s A Chilling Glimpse | Fastcodesign The tangible cause and effect of the Facebook revelations have the tech media in a spin. Meanwhile, Paypal quietly released details of their data sharing practices in January to comply within European law. That the response was just as quiet shows how routine a practice this is. This one is particularly galling given the paucity of genuine alternatives.

Group Madness

I’m still coming to terms with the level of surprise writ large in this debacle. The contemporary social contract has been a digital exchange for some time. Self surveillance is the norm, not an exception.

Facebook Has Had Countless Privacy Scandals. But This One Is Different The optimist has it this will incite a revolt. As much as I’d like to believe it, I see little around me to support the claim. I haven’t logged into Facebook for months, my reticence long established. However, I would wager that rolling through my ‘news’ feed will be a strangely self contained outrage directed at Facebook, within Facebook itself.

This is a data collection scandal. This is a scandal triggered by a specific incident, but that is broadly about the ways massive companies track us, harvest information from us, and then sell us as coercion targets in sophisticated information campaigns that could be for anything from diapers to mattresses to anti-vax literature.

The story will endure not because of animosity toward political data use but because it perfectly touches upon a deeper anxiety about our online privacy that’s been building for years. Indeed, the Cambridge Analytica scandal could well be the catalyst for a much bigger targeting revolt — a full-scale personal and public reckoning that looks at the way we’ve used the internet for the last decade. It’s a moment that forces us, collectively, to step back and think about what we sacrificed for a more convenient and connected world. And on an internet that feels increasingly toxic it’s hard to look at the tradeoffs we’ve made and feel like we’re getting a fair deal.

Then again, I’m just as likely to find all the awkward emotional oversharing, inner monologues, and general nonsense as usual.

Why Nothing Is Going To Happen To Facebook Or Mark Zuckerberg  On the flip-side. Where some see revolt, others see business as usual.

With Wall Street leading the way, the four entities with the strongest ability to cause long-term damage to Facebook in response to revelations that Cambridge Analytica illicitly used 50 million of its users’ data for political purposes didn’t seem ready to do so: Analysts told investors to buy the dip. Advertisers kept spending. Legislators continued to sit on their hands while a basic ad transparency bill rotted in Congress. And though users posted #DeleteFacebook en masse, Facebook actually rose to 8th place from 12th in the iOS mobile App Store since the day before the Cambridge Analytica news broke. It’s holding steady on Android, too.

No one can pretend Facebook is just harmless fun any more | The Guardian

We have now reached the point where an unaccountable private corporation is holding detailed data on over a quarter of the world’s population. Zuckerberg and his company have been avoiding responsibility for some time. Governments everywhere need to get serious in how they deal with Facebook.

How to Use Facebook While Giving It the Minimum Amount of Personal Data | the Verge  Some advice for minimising the data you share with Facebook. I’m all likelihood it’s too late, but developing good, conscious habits is always a good thing

Towards a world without Facebook | TechCrunch  A modest proposal if ever I saw one. I have sniped and snarked at crypto currencies on these pages, often with vague hat tipping toward the untapped potential of blockchain technology for other purposes. But I’ll admit, I hardly ever come across hard coded examples, let alone share them. Interestingly, the Facebook debacle has given us a barn to aim at, so we should see some interesting attempts at turning the page

We’re approaching — or maybe already at — the point at which these tools could be put together to construct, say, a small-scale decentralized social network. It would still face the critical-mass problem: but that could be addressed by focusing on specific cohorts and communities; art collectives, churches, fandoms, etcetera. It would still face the ordinary-people-don’t-want-tokens problem: but that could be addressed by having a designated token-handling admin for each node, in the same way that online communities used to have designated email admins or local Usenet sysadmins, so ordinary users would just need a URL, a userid/password, and perhaps a decision whether to pay for access or be advertised to.

Are you ready? This is all the data Facebook and Google have on you | The Guardian — If you still need a readout, this provides a decent run down of that data hoarding at Facebook and Google. But wait, there’s more — much more.

Mark Zuckerberg Thinks We’re Idiots | Monday Note Not a novel point, the irony in this claim has reached catch phrase proportions by now. Then again, if ever there were a time to put a finer point on it.

As Facebook’s leader, Zuckerberg resolves to get things straightened out in the future (“it’s my job, right?”) while he delivers a callcenter-style broken record reassurance: “Your privacy is important to us”. Yes, of course, our privacy is important to you; you made billions by surveilling and mining our private lives. One wonders how aware Zuckerberg is of the double entendre.

What Else Floats on Water

Apple, everyone needs more free iCloud storage | The Verge  Honestly, Apple may as well give us the bird for all you can store in 5Gb. For all the talk of user hostile action on the design front, examples of inaction offer enough insight inot priorities. At least for anyone not prone to religious feelings.

Apple: Former Engineer Will Unlock iPhone X for $15,000 | Fortune   Despite the sense this has always been a lucrative business waiting to happen, surely setting up this enterprise involved navigating a labrynthe of  mind-bending legal chicanery.

Stanford Students Challenge Apple on iPhone Addiction | Inside Higher Ed  Yeah, I can’t see Apple helping people use their devices less. Unless, of course, there is a way to spin it.

iOS 11 Bugs Are so Common They Now Appear in Apple Ads | the Verge  This has since been cleaned up. Amusing, yes. At the same time, it points to a normalisation of novelty over stability. All but unique to software as a product,  we essentially purchase it broken, and pay to have it fixed. Even if we pay for it via the hardware. Rumour has it this year's update to iOS will be a stability release.

Apple CEO Tim Cook says Facebook should have regulated itself, but it’s too late for that now | Recode – Call me a cynic 2, but this is a little convenient for — and from — Apple. If I prefer Apple's approach, I'm not so comfortable with subtle opportunism. Privacy wouldn’t be a selling point if they didn’t have anything to differentiate themselves from.

Cook has made a point of criticizing Facebook for both the Cambridge Analytica affair and its overall approach to consumer privacy in recent days. But it’s not a new stance for him or the company: He made similar comments about Facebook and Google in 2015, and his predecessor Steve Jobs went out of his way to contrast Apple’s privacy stance with rivals like Google in 2010.

I don't doubt the existence of influential voices arguing for it's inherant value, but if it didn't have that other kind of value we wouldn't find so many contradictions Look a little closer and you fill find a fair degree of enabling. Take the Uber debacle, Apple has been found greasing the wheels before. Or more recently, the situation in China with carte Blanche to encryption keys. Intentional or not, this looks a cynical intervention. Apple’s own iCloud even runs on Google infrastructure, so pull that apart.

Bob Burrough | Twitter — Further to the above, this from a former Apple luminary pointing to the absurdly broad language from Apple claiming to keep all data safe from prying eyes. The line is crossed where the claim is made that your web traffic is kept private, to which Burroughs counters:

Since This Is Obviously Not True, the Only Possible Options Here Are: – Apple Believes This Is True, and They're Too Foolish to See How It Isn't. – Apple Doesn't Believe This, and They're Misleading Customers for Marketing Reasons.”

Apple’s approach might be more desireble, but to think of them as some benevolent entity immune from the profit motive is naive at best.

Now, Look Here

A Startup Is Pitching a Mind-Uploading Service That Is “100 Percent Fatal” | MIT Technology Review  A materialist’s guide to the afterlife

This story has a grisly twist, though. For Nectome’s procedure to work, it’s essential that the brain be fresh. The company says its plan is to connect people with terminal illnesses to a heart-lung machine in order to pump its mix of scientific embalming chemicals into the big carotid arteries in their necks while they are still alive (though under general anesthesia).

‘Blockchain' Is Meaningless | the Verge  The Appropriation of language is a uniquely troubling proposition in a capitalist society. There’s too much incentive for opportunism. Scratch that, the appropriation of everything.

Bose Sunglasses Hands-on: Audio AR Makes More Sense Than You Think | Engadget  Or does it? Nobody seems to learn this lesson. Allow me to phrase it in the turned about syntax of a little green mad with a laser sword: A model for success nerds and fashion are not. 3

Exclusive: This Is the Most Dexterous Robot Ever Created | MIT Technology Review  If you’re not keeping up with robots, you might have missed this.

AI Has a Hallucination Problem That's Proving Tough to Fix | WIRED — Computer says no.

Spotify Needs Your Help Tagging and Sorting Tunes | Engadget  Economists of a particular persuasion worked this out a very long time ago. It’s called surplus value, and this is a clever, if insidious way to capture it. The more work consumers do, the less resources Spotify need to spend, and voila more profit from that surplus. I’m not saying don’t do it, I’m merely bringing the aporia to your attention. This is the real gift economy

Broaden Your Mind

If we have come to the same intersection again, only to recognise it as such, I would at least like to think we might turn left this time. While the world is run by creeps, there are still good people out there, doing good work.

12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech | Humane Tech – You don’t need to agree with all of this to recognise its potential importance. A lot of these points seem obvious to anyone who can think even the smallest bit sociologically, but sadly are lost on most people working in, writing about, or commenting on technology. Usually to quote the first paragraph of an article is a good indication that linker hasn’t read it, in this instance it means this is the point.

…tech goes a lot deeper than the phones in our hands, and we must understand some fundamental shifts in society if we’re going to make good decisions about the way tech companies shape our lives—and especially if we want to influence the people who actually make technology.

It would appear the timing is right for a new approach to technology in general. What we have now is parristic, and disturbing.

And Now, For Something Completely Different

How Two Photographers Unknowingly Shot the Same Millisecond in Time | Petapixel  I have a thing for coincidence. So often the impression of synchronicity is a psychological phenomenon, but this one has irrefutable physical evidence. This is, in a word, neat.

Why the PDF Is Secretly the World's Most Important File Format | Motherboard  Something that most academic users are intimately acquainted with.

Photo by Caroline Methot on Unsplash

  1. Don’t get me started on how people use the word ‘random’
  2. Many people do
  3. Sorry, Apple doesn’t count — they’re a fashion brand making consumer electronics these days, not the other way around.

Making Slides | kieranhealy.org

This is timely from Kieran Healy . I’m just now working on a review of the wonderful Markdown slide deck app Deckset.  This is as good a primer on presentation technique as I have come across.

It doesn’t cover the tools. That makes sense, the tools shouldn’t matter — if they can get out of your way that is. I would argue, to put this advice into practice means allocating your focus away from the kerning of application settings and onto ideas. The right tool can give you the means to do that. It is worth thinking about, if you're going to head advice such as this;

The actual slides are the most immediately visible but also the least substantively important part of your material. While I’m going to highlight a few rules and techniques about making decent slides, do not lose sight of the fact that if your paper is bad, your talk is going to be bad too.

The paper is not the talk. The paper is what the talk is about. In some fields, the talk can be very closely related to the paper, and there are still people trained to “read the paper” in the old-fashioned sense. But this is increasingly rare. In most fields, especially when presenting the results of a data analysis, the presenter must condense, summarize, and highlight the important parts of their own work. The paper is the most important thing; the talk is about the paper; and you use your slides to help you give a better talk.

How To Change Your Facebook Settings To Opt Out of Platform API Sharing | EFF

With the Facebook scandal casting a shadow on anything even remotely tech related, we're not short on opinion. What's surprised me most about the whole situation, is that anyone should be surprised at all. What's more, I can't see how the proposed changes will do much.  The most expedient thing right now would seem to be sharing information like this from the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Locking your profile down, insofar as it can be locked down. While you defintely should — lock it down — sadly the horse has bolted, and with your data.

Over the weekend, it became clear that Cambridge Analytica, a data analytics company, got access to more than 50 million Facebook users' data in 2014. The data was overwhelmingly collected, shared, and stored without user consent. The scale of this violation of user privacy reflects how Facebook's terms of service and API were structured at the time. Make no mistake: this was not a data breach. This was exactly how Facebook's infrastructure was designed to work.

My point exactly, this is how it was designed to work. Nobody should be the least bit surprised at this situation. If you’re similarly cynical about the efficacy of the plan to address the situation, and at the same time caught in a bind like most people on the question of whether to keep using the service. The minimum requirement is another look over those settings.

You shouldn't have to do this. You shouldn't have to wade through complicated privacy settings in order to ensure that the companies with which you've entrusted your personal information are making reasonable, legal efforts to protect it. But Facebook has allowed third parties to violate user privacy on an unprecedented scale, and, while legislators and regulators scramble to understand the implications and put limits in place, users are left with the responsibility to make sure their profiles are properly configured.

Not only should you not have to do it, but you shouldn’t expect that settings will routinely change to such a degree that maintaining the level of privacy you desire requires you to check over it every time Facebook rearranges the furniture.

 

Alphabet’s ‘Outline’ Homebrew VPN Software Offers Open-Source, Easy Set-Up Privacy You Control

Alphabet's ‘Outline' looks an interesting project. I want to revisit some of the security/privacy recommendations on this site, my own perspective on private VPN companies has shifted since I last wrote about one in particular. I would agree this is not a ‘privacy panacea’, but have every intention of seeing if I can break it.

Jigsaw, the Alphabet-owned Google sibling that serves as a human rights-focused tech incubator, will now offer VPN software that you can easily set up on your own server—or at least, one you set up yourself, and control in the cloud. And unlike older homebrew VPN code, Jigsaw says it's focused on making the setup and hosting of that server simple enough that even small, less savvy organizations or even individual users can do it in minutes

Sociologists Examine Hackathons and See Exploitation | Wired

Study sociology long enough, not only does the world look different, but you’ll start to forget it does. This is lightweight from Wired, naturally, but this is something the tech world has become very good at. Abstraction of value from labour in its myriad forms.

One pair of sociologists recently examined hackathons and emerged with troubling conclusions. Sharon Zukin, professor of sociology at Brooklyn College and CUNY Graduate Center, spent a year observing seven hackathons, mostly sponsored by corporations, in New York City, interviewing participants, organizers, and sponsors. In a study called “Hackathons As Co-optation Ritual: Socializing Workers and Institutionalizing Innovation in the ‘New’ Economy,” she and co-author Max Papadantonakis argue that hackathons create “fictional expectations of innovation that benefits all,” which Zukin writes is a “powerful strategy for manufacturing workers’ consent in the ‘new’ economy.” In other words, institutions use the allure of hackathons, with sponsors, prizes, snacks, and potential for career advancement, to get people to work for free.

This is not unique to the collective wager of hackathons, there are mundane examples everywhere. For instance, I very casually check-in on a discussion group for a popular ‘tech’ podcast hosted on a major social media platform. The forum is run by listeners, who volunteer time — in some cases, a seemingly inordinate amount of it. Listeners are generating content, giving product recommendations that are turned into affiliate links on the show, and so on. Like I said, mundane. An yet, if you are going to talk about the so-called ‘new’ economy 1, like everything you have to consider how it scales. The underlying economic socialisation equates to the same thing.

 

  1. Which incidentally, is a bullshit term.