Last day for 50% Discount on 2Do — 5 March, 2018

With all the attention being lavished on Things 3, it's easy to forget there are other excellent task managers out there. One such app is the wonderfully powerful, and endlessly customisable 2Do. In my humble opinion, 2Do is one of the highlights in the Setapp collection, but it’s also available as a standalone purchase via the App Store. If you have been thinking of picking up a copy, there is no time like the present. The developer has been running a sale, which ends today.

Available on the App Store, for iOS (Universal) and macOS

Some Brief Thoughts on Things 3 vs Todoist

Things 3 better than Todoist

Everybody’s talking about Things 3. Now that I’m on the bandwagon, here is my take on what makes it presently the best task manager for macOS and iOS — for me at least. Inevitably this mean comparison with what I turned over along the way. Running pathological optimism means I’ve tried them all, but Todoist got left behind this time round. I’m not here to run that app down, it remains excellent for many reasons — maybe even better in ways that don’t matter to my workflow. But, should you be wondering, is Things 3 better than Todoist, perhaps this will be useful.

Todoist or not Todoist

I‘ve only been using Things 3 for a few months. In truth, I’m generally suspicious of trends, so I tried to avoid it while I still had good reason to. Even if I’m only making excuses, I need more than new and shiny. Thankfully, a genuine reason presented itself when my Todoist subscription was up for renewal. The cost of renewing that sub wasn’t much less than buying the Things 3 suite outright. Between the annually recurrent cost, and various Todoist annoyances, it was worth kicking the tyres. As it turned out, a trial on macOS convinced me to jump.

Initially there were two features I missed from Todoist. I’m over them both already. First, the API allowed me to use Zapier, and/or IFTTT for various automations. Second is the natural language parsing for task entry. At least I missed that until I realised it’s either a bonhomie for laziness, or an easy way to fill up a task list with lots of nonsense you’ll never do. Never mind that with a keyboard the difference in keystrokes is minimal. I’m not saying I wouldn’t like to see better natural language support added to Things 3 — it does include some basic date parsing abilities — but it doesn’t come close to being the show stopper I thought it might. If anything, the relative slowdown — minimal as it is — helps add a little more deliberation into the process.

 

best task manager for macOS and iOS
Things 3 includes very basic natural language parsing for dates

To the first point, with native automation Cultured Code has made significant inroads to mitigate some of the abilities lost by not having an API. By all accounts, the recent addition of a deep, and flexible URL scheme is just the beginning, with other innovations on the way.I would argue that inter-app automation is not just as useful, but in some ways more relevant. The automation I used most would automatically copy editorial tasks to Trello. I was able to create an analogue of that on iOS, using Workflow.  Anyone who complains about the ‘extra step’ of pushing a button could look out the window once in a while.

Native inter-app automation breaks dependence on the web. In the process it cuts back the surface area of data-sharing with third-parties. More than that, there is an immediacy to working locally that allows for sharing rich data. Being able to delineate notes, mind maps, or outlines into actions opens up all kinds of possibility for continuity.  Particularly for a writing workflow. This makes a lot of sense for academic work, research, and writing. Or for any other kind of work that includes creative planning.

It’s true the barrier to entry for URL based automation is a little higher than web automation. It’s not that it’s difficult to grasp, more that building the links themselves can be tedious. Cultured Code appear wise to this, having created a link building tool on their website. With nothing left to miss, one can enjoy all the benefits delivered by clever design choices, and opinionated simplicity. Ironically, my biggest concern over both those features was the possibility for double handling and time wasting. And yet, Things 3 is both an app I would rather spend time using, and one I don’t have to.

Subtleties

Things 3 better than Todoist
Subtle design elements make Things 3 a pleasure to use

While these new automation features are getting all the attention right now, it’s a couple of subtle, but significant design choices that make Things 3 so effective. I found the flexibility of Todoist equal parts powerful and beguiling. Getting the most from it requires one to configure projects, labels, and priorities to facilitate query filters built around those different pieces of metadata. If you get it right you can contextualise your workload with extremely specific queries. This is a major strength if you need that kind of detail, however, with so much configuring, and fiddling to get it right, it can also be a headache. I never felt like I had it configured very well, so the temptation to reconfigure always hovered.

Things 3 is completely different. I'm not going to run through all of its features, there are better places for that. For my money, what makes Things 3 worth recommending is a couple of subtleties that mean I spend less time managing my task list.

The first touch is indicative of the user experience in general. The way Things 3 handles the inbox. Processing is simple, a task only requires one touch for removal from view. If all you ever want to do is put due dates on your tasks, Things 3 will consider them processed and essentially remove them from view, until the day they require actioning. If you’re wired to slowly disintegrate when faced with growing clutter, this is priceless. Most task mangers have some kind of filtered view to show you only the tasks you need to see, but they all require a lot more interaction. Things 3 is designed to cut back on over-processing by making it extremely simple to get a hold on what needs doing. In that way it’s the opposite of Todoist, but that doesn’t mean it is without flexibility.

The emphasis in the Things 3 user experience is on aesthetics. As a method for task management, it leans on visual organisation. Elements like headings, tags, and manual ordering, can be employed in the myriad ways. They can even constitute productivity systems favoured by nerds. On the flipside, Things offers enough customisation to avoid forcing users into an inflexible, or totalising system. Configuration requires little fuss if simplicity is your thing.  Or, the various organisational delimiters apply to whatever bespoke version of getting things done you run with.

Data Security

With this app being written about so much, I might surprised to have hardly seen security mentioned, if it weren’t for the fact this is an area that very little light is shined on in general with task managers. Given I was using Todoist, it would be a little rich to take Things 3 to task over security holes. I would argue that Todoist does the minimum required for data security; they could do more. While the mechanics are similar, it's a fact that  Things 3 is better than Todoist on security. Cultured Code use better encryption, and provide better insight into what they are doing. Nonetheless, the proprietary syncing would be dramatically improved with client side encryption.

From a personal point of view — and this was the same stance I had with Todoist — should anyone hack them, my own task list would not be the most exciting or revelatory reading. Unfortunately, in taking this stance I’m part of the problem, as it overlooks the importance of data security in general. Users so commonly make these kinds of compromises, we excuse developers from making improvements. Who can blame them for focusing on the squeeky door? A little more noise would go a long way to ensuring security standards are improved more generally.

Cultured Code suggests they may add client side encryption ‘at a later time’, I would add that it is on users to ensure they do that by making clear it is necessary. This remains an opportunity for them, especially considering the OmniGroup are setting the standard for end-to-end encryption in their software. Which means, if you cannot afford to compromise on security at all, I would recommend using OmniFocus. With all the changes coming this year, OmniFocus is worth keeping an eye on. Should they drastically improve the user experience, the security factor will have me sorely tempted to jump again. In the meantime, if you’re using Things 3, know that your data is pretty secure, but not that secure.

Is Things the best Task Manager for macOS and iOS?

That seems to be the question everyone wants answered, but changing your task manager for the sake of it is madness. Unless it’s your hobby, in which case I can’t help you. 1 If you have something that is working well for you nEverybody’s talking about Things 3. Now that I’m on the bandwagon, here is my take on what makes it presently the best task manager for macOS and iOSow, I’m an advocate for the ‘ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ adage. On the other hand, if you’re struggling with an unnecessarily complex setup, or software that ends up being another thing to manage, you could do a lot worse than give Things 3 a look. It is being talked about with good reason. 2 If you have never used a task manager before, choosing the right one can be confusing, but I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend this to new users.

For my own purposes, right now Things 3 is the best task manager for macOS and iOS. While not perfect by any means, it manages to walk the fine line between simplicity, and customisation. Again, my aim is not to deride Todoist, nothing has stopped it bearing the standard for cross platform support, collaboration, and web automation. But, if you’re already half way out the door, in many ways I have found Things 3 better than Todoist.

For macOS users, a free trial for Things 3 is available, or you can pick it up on the Mac App Store. Unfortunately, the iOS app is not universal, so you do have to buy seperate apps for iPhone and iPad. Although, that does mean if you want to try it out on iOS without going all in, you can purchase the cheaper iPhone version to get started.

  1. Unless I can recommend a good book
  2. For one thing, it is the first task manager that hasn’t found a way to truly annoy me.

Setapp Adds Premium Task Management App 2Do

I have already written about the value of subscribing to Setapp, but the service just keeps getting better. The utility of this service for academic work should be hard to ignore for a lot of people, especially for students, considering the potential savings on apps you might only need for the duration of your studies. They recently added education pricing, and now they have added one of the very best task managers available to their impressive inventory. I have been a user of 2Do in the past, and wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it to anyone. It is easily the most flexible, and customisable task manager available, and has picked up something of a cult following in the past few years.

2Do is on of the most powerful task management apps available today. It is an ideal app for keeping the demands of study and research in order. 2Do is on of the most powerful task management apps available today. It is an ideal app for keeping the demands of study and research in order.

Task Managers for University Life

University Task Managers

Back to School

Thinking about a friend of mine going back to school this year, I wanted to put together some ideas for setting up that shiny new device to make it useful for the classroom, and for just generally keeping everything together. These things can get a little carried away, so the intention is to break them up and post them in parts.

It is a little while ago now, but I returned to university after an intended break of a couple years turned into more than a decade of itinerant avoidance. What confronted me when I (re)started was a ludicrous sprawling bureaucracy that made about as much sense as a Trump tweet. Worse still, it was immediately clear that I had very little, if any, idea of how to organise myself in this new context. Enter technology. I would hardly call the geek in me latent, but here was an excuse to embrace an otherwise embarrassing fetish for details.

I have in mind what is useful for university life, but much of this will likely be true for anyone faced with juggling the demands of a saturated schedule. You have dozens of places to be at different times, assignment due dates, tests and exams. Kafkaesque administration, library book returns, transport timetables, study groups, meetings. And any number of things you should turn down but won't. In short, you have a shit load to keep track of.

My advice is to start using a decent task manager. Sure, you could muddle through with a shambling calendar, email, a fancy moleskin diary, writing on the back of your hand or licking your finger and shoving it in the air, but you know it will all start to unravel pretty quickly. I have a terrible relationship with the word ‘no'. I will overload my schedule by comedic proportions to avoid using that word. Using a task manager has not only meant having some kind of grasp on that particular issue, but it has saved me time and again from the consequences of marrying it to a terminally leaky memory and inability to grasp what is actually possible in a given amount of time. If a task manager can help me it can help anyone.

Time Management Apps

If you are looking move beyond a shambling calendar and perfunctory reminder system, here are some options:

Omnifocus

Omnifocus University Task Manager

If you are actually interested in this kind of stuff (and if you are, you know what I mean) then you have already heard of this. More than an app, this is a system. It requires some commitment and at least a little working knowledge of the getting things done methodology to make sense. Most students will justifiably balk at the price, and there is some complexity to setting it up. However, the payoff for adopting it is large. As an added bonus, Omnifocus itself can handle a fair share of your procrastination needs if you want to dive into automation and customisation. See links below to get you started in case you do want to jump off this particular bridge macOSiOS

2Do

2do University Task Manager

One of the most customisable task management applications you will come across. You can bend it to you will. This will be the best choice for most people who want much more than simple reminders, but don't want to go full nerd and join the GTD cult, although if even if you want that 2Do has you well covered. Also cross platform these days, so if you're mixing and matching devices you can just hook up dropbox, or any number of other options and sync away. You can pick it up on the app store for  macOS or iOS. It is also available with a Setapp subscription.

Todoist

Todoist University Task Manager

Natural language entry is undoubtedly the coolest thing about todoist. To add a task you simply type it in, e.g Essay on the Ontological Necessity of Modern Man's Existential Dilemma due on the 30th – Todoist magically turns what you write into the task parameters, adding an alarm for the date, and so on. If you are interested in nerding out on automation, then services like IFTTT or Zapier have you covered. You can use it right out of the box, but you will need to a subscription if you want to use some of the more advanced features. Unlike most of the other apps here, Todoist is also has genuine collaboration features. Also cross platform, but apple nerds can find it here: macOS and here: iOS

A Left Field Option

This is something a little different. Depending on how you work, employing a means for tracking what you have done can be just as important as remembering what you must do. It doesn't matter what level of academic work or research you are doing, you will, mostly be absorbing a lot of material — doing a lot of reading. keeping track of where you are with the material is more than usual. For this part of my own workflow I use Taskpaper.

Taskpaper

Taskpaper University Task Manager

I have flipped between the more fully featured task management apps above in different ways, and at different times. I'm happy to recommend all three. The natural language parsing has me sticking with Todoist, for the moment.  However, I find myself using Taskpaper more and more on a day to day basis for other things.  Its unique blend of outlining and task management make it ideal for research and writing, and you can dig right in if you want to put it to work in a more comprehensive way. I find it particularly useful for tasks that need to be broken down into a long checklist of smaller actions. Loading everything into your main task manager is not always the best idea, so having something like Taskpaper to supplement your time management is helpful.

Taskpaper is a deceptively powerful application, my use case is seriously underselling its potential. There is no reason you can't go all in with it. For some time using with iOS required implementing one or another minor hack, myself I use Editorial. However, the Tasmator app has received a little love recently, so it is iOS compliant.  You could do worse than to check out a demo of the app Taskpaper, or you can grab it from the Mac App Store. It is also available with a Setapp subscription.

Honorable mentions

  • TrelloTrello is a wonderful service for any number of things. It is especially useful for collaborative projects, but you can really put it to work in any way you want to. If you are a visual thinker, this may be it for you. iOS
  • WunderlistWunderlist is a great option if you want something fairly simple and visually appealing. I use it with my partner for any kind of list we want to share, shopping, travelling, or the secret locations of things we have hidden from our 2-year old. My partner is using it to write a thesis, so it is certainly capable enough. iOSmacOS

Cursory Advice

If I had to choose only one of these to recommend to somebody setting up a task manager for the first time, it would be 2Do. It is easy to learn, simple to setup and has everything you could possibly need in a task management application. If integration with other services, automation, and/or collaboration are what you are looking for, then start with Todoist. On the other hand, if you are want to turn productivity apps into a hobby or implement a full-on life encompassing system of organisation, then Omnifocus could be it for you. If you are into plain text solutions, tend to arrange your thoughts in outlines and like elegant simplicity, then try Taskpaper.

To Get You Started

Omnifocus

2Do

  • The 2Do official site is very useful, with loads of Tips & Tricks
  • You can find a (painfully) detailed (but very useful) introduction to the app at Macstories
  • A much more concise introduction here
  • Here is a comparison between 2Do and Todoist if such a thing might prove helpful Todoist vs. 2Do

Todoist

Taskpaper

  • Again, start with the official Taskpaper site. Try the FAQs and the blog
  • One of Taskpaper's more illustrious users, Brett Terpstra can attest to it's usefulness.
  • Gabe Weatherhead's Macdrifter is a great source for material on any number of things, Taskpaper being one of them. Macdrifter could have been listed in the Omnifocus links
  • Profhacker has a brief introduction to the app. Given the apparent focus of this site, that would seem appropriate.