Task Managers for University Life

University Task Managers

Back to School

Thinking about a friend of mine going back to school this year, I wanted to put together some ideas for setting up that shiny new device to make it useful for the classroom, and for just generally keeping everything together. These things can get a little carried away, so the intention is to break them up and post them in parts.

It is a little while ago now, but I returned to university after an intended break of a couple years turned into more than a decade of itinerant avoidance. What confronted me when I (re)started was a ludicrous sprawling bureaucracy that made about as much sense as a Trump tweet. Worse still, it was immediately clear that I had very little, if any, idea of how to organise myself in this new context. Enter technology. I would hardly call the geek in me latent, but here was an excuse to embrace an otherwise embarrassing fetish for details.

I have in mind what is useful for university life, but much of this will likely be true for anyone faced with juggling the demands of a saturated schedule. You have dozens of places to be at different times, assignment due dates, tests and exams. Kafkaesque administration, library book returns, transport timetables, study groups, meetings. And any number of things you should turn down but won't. In short, you have a shit load to keep track of.

My advice is to start using a decent task manager. Sure, you could muddle through with a shambling calendar, email, a fancy moleskin diary, writing on the back of your hand or licking your finger and shoving it in the air, but you know it will all start to unravel pretty quickly. I have a terrible relationship with the word ‘no'. I will overload my schedule by comedic proportions to avoid using that word. Using a task manager has not only meant having some kind of grasp on that particular issue, but it has saved me time and again from the consequences of marrying it to a terminally leaky memory and inability to grasp what is actually possible in a given amount of time. If a task manager can help me it can help anyone.

Time Management Apps

If you are looking move beyond a shambling calendar and perfunctory reminder system, here are some options:

Omnifocus

Omnifocus University Task Manager

If you are actually interested in this kind of stuff (and if you are, you know what I mean) then you have already heard of this. More than an app, this is a system. It requires some commitment and at least a little working knowledge of the getting things done methodology to make sense. Most students will justifiably balk at the price, and there is some complexity to setting it up. However, the payoff for adopting it is large. As an added bonus, Omnifocus itself can handle a fair share of your procrastination needs if you want to dive into automation and customisation. See links below to get you started in case you do want to jump off this particular bridge macOSiOS

2Do

2do University Task Manager

One of the most customisable task management applications you will come across. You can bend it to you will. This will be the best choice for most people who want much more than simple reminders, but don't want to go full nerd and join the GTD cult, although if even if you want that 2Do has you well covered. Also cross platform these days, so if you're mixing and matching devices you can just hook up dropbox, or any number of other options and sync away. You can pick it up on the app store for  macOS or iOS. It is also available with a Setapp subscription.

Todoist

Todoist University Task Manager

Natural language entry is undoubtedly the coolest thing about todoist. To add a task you simply type it in, e.g Essay on the Ontological Necessity of Modern Man's Existential Dilemma due on the 30th – Todoist magically turns what you write into the task parameters, adding an alarm for the date, and so on. If you are interested in nerding out on automation, then services like IFTTT or Zapier have you covered. You can use it right out of the box, but you will need to a subscription if you want to use some of the more advanced features. Unlike most of the other apps here, Todoist is also has genuine collaboration features. Also cross platform, but apple nerds can find it here: macOS and here: iOS

A Left Field Option

This is something a little different. Depending on how you work, employing a means for tracking what you have done can be just as important as remembering what you must do. It doesn't matter what level of academic work or research you are doing, you will, mostly be absorbing a lot of material — doing a lot of reading. keeping track of where you are with the material is more than usual. For this part of my own workflow I use Taskpaper.

Taskpaper

Taskpaper University Task Manager

I have flipped between the more fully featured task management apps above in different ways, and at different times. I'm happy to recommend all three. The natural language parsing has me sticking with Todoist, for the moment.  However, I find myself using Taskpaper more and more on a day to day basis for other things.  Its unique blend of outlining and task management make it ideal for research and writing, and you can dig right in if you want to put it to work in a more comprehensive way. I find it particularly useful for tasks that need to be broken down into a long checklist of smaller actions. Loading everything into your main task manager is not always the best idea, so having something like Taskpaper to supplement your time management is helpful.

Taskpaper is a deceptively powerful application, my use case is seriously underselling its potential. There is no reason you can't go all in with it. For some time using with iOS required implementing one or another minor hack, myself I use Editorial. However, the Tasmator app has received a little love recently, so it is iOS compliant.  You could do worse than to check out a demo of the app Taskpaper, or you can grab it from the Mac App Store. It is also available with a Setapp subscription.

Honorable mentions

  • TrelloTrello is a wonderful service for any number of things. It is especially useful for collaborative projects, but you can really put it to work in any way you want to. If you are a visual thinker, this may be it for you. iOS
  • WunderlistWunderlist is a great option if you want something fairly simple and visually appealing. I use it with my partner for any kind of list we want to share, shopping, travelling, or the secret locations of things we have hidden from our 2-year old. My partner is using it to write a thesis, so it is certainly capable enough. iOSmacOS

Cursory Advice

If I had to choose only one of these to recommend to somebody setting up a task manager for the first time, it would be 2Do. It is easy to learn, simple to setup and has everything you could possibly need in a task management application. If integration with other services, automation, and/or collaboration are what you are looking for, then start with Todoist. On the other hand, if you are want to turn productivity apps into a hobby or implement a full-on life encompassing system of organisation, then Omnifocus could be it for you. If you are into plain text solutions, tend to arrange your thoughts in outlines and like elegant simplicity, then try Taskpaper.

To Get You Started

Omnifocus

2Do

  • The 2Do official site is very useful, with loads of Tips & Tricks
  • You can find a (painfully) detailed (but very useful) introduction to the app at Macstories
  • A much more concise introduction here
  • Here is a comparison between 2Do and Todoist if such a thing might prove helpful Todoist vs. 2Do

Todoist

Taskpaper

  • Again, start with the official Taskpaper site. Try the FAQs and the blog
  • One of Taskpaper's more illustrious users, Brett Terpstra can attest to it's usefulness.
  • Gabe Weatherhead's Macdrifter is a great source for material on any number of things, Taskpaper being one of them. Macdrifter could have been listed in the Omnifocus links
  • Profhacker has a brief introduction to the app. Given the apparent focus of this site, that would seem appropriate.