Focus Sounds: Rival Consoles Persona

Thoughtful Music for Concentration

music for concentration
Rival Consoles' 2018 album Persona provides a wonderfully nuanced and evocative atmosphere without being too distracting

For this edition of Focus Sounds I can’t go past another Erased Tapes artist, Despite to the connection with the previous recommendation, I couldn’t turn this one away. But, don’t let the label fool you into presuming this is more of the same. Erased Tapes’ specialty is defying genre, so this is an entirely different mood to Tag Eins Tag Zwei. The album in question is the recently released Persona, from Rival Consoles.

I know some folk prefer a relative sameness for a writing environment. I find that doesn’t work for me. Different tones are appropriate to the distinct kinds of writing I’m doing. Where certain moods need to be carried, or gently maintained, others might benefit from being interrupted. The nuances of cadence can maintain the pace, or even slow one down where necessary. Writing can be like that, and with academic work there also is the reading to consider.

Persona, the latest album from Ryan Lee West — aka Rival Consoles — is aptly reflective for kind of work I’m focused on right now. At the same time, it has the kind of insistent metre that encourages output. By West’s own admission, Persona is sonically diverse. If at times the soundscape is evocative, it isn’t overwhelmingly so. I find this characteristic of the best music for concentration. It can’t distract too much, but neither should it be utterly boring.

A criteria I stand by in selecting music for working, it has to merit listening to regardless. In other words, I want more than just background music. I’m not riding an elevator, I’m trying to create something I’m proud off. It helps to know I’m sharing the space with something thought provoking in itself, Persona is this kind of record. As the liner notes from Erased Tapes explain:

The title ‘Persona’ was inspired by Ingmar Bergman’s film of the same name, specifically a shot in the opening credits of a child reaching out to touch a woman’s face on a screen, which is shifting between one face and another. This powerful image struck Ryan and it inspired the album’s main theme — an exploration of the persona, the difference between how we see ourselves and how others see us, the spaces in between; between states, people, light and dark, the inner persona and the outer persona.

Not all that long ago I was all but viscerally opposed to most electronic music. Mores the pity that it took me so long to come around and discover artists like Rival Consoles. I can’t presume to offer writing advice; not for the battle I undertake to get things done. What I can do is pass along anything that helps. Persona falls squarely in that category.

As ever, you will find the album everywhere you would expect.

Apple Music

Amazon

Bandcamp

Private and Secure File Transfer with Dropshare

Send Large Files Secure

On Mac Geek Gab recently a listener was looking for a secure solution for transferring files. The question was how to send files securely without the need for the recipient to install anything at their end. Although between the show and geek community, there were some great solutions, I thought I would share my own here. If I ever need quick and easy file sharing, particularly to send large files, I use Dropshare with Backblaze B2 for storage. For extra security, Dropshare can create password protected URLs to protect your file transfers.

Using DropShare to Send Large Files

Dropshare is essentially an open alternative to CloudApp or Droplr. The idea is a quick and easy method to bypass email for transferring files. To risk stating the obvious, email has never been an ideal for transporting anything other small files. Even allowing for limited file size, there are too many moving parts to ensure it is secure, and it can be slow and unreliable. Most people get around this with more generic cloud storage, like Dropbox, but using a purpose built solution is faster and more convenient. File transfer services were built from the need for fast sharing of image files and videos direct from the desktop, and have evolved from there.

 

The crucial difference between CloudApp or Droplr, and Dropshare, is where your files are stored. Like the first two, Dropshare has its own cloud service 1, but not only does it support numerous other connections, but users can setup multiple locations to choose between. That means rather than paying a monthly fee and dealing with usage caps and so on, you can buy the app outright and set it up how you like. Supported connections include Rackspace, Azure, Amazon S3, Google Drive, or any custom S3-API connection, which means using Digital Ocean and others. You can even set it up to use your Synology NAS, or to use SCP over SSH.

Then there is the connection I’m pushing, Backblaze B2. Backblaze gives you 10Gb of B2 storage for free. Not only is that more than enough storage for my needs, but I already use Backblaze for personal backup. Enabling B2 storage requires a tick box in one’s user account, and setting up storage containers is dead easy. In. short, its secure, free and easy. 2

Private and Secure File Transfer with Dropshare

With Dropshare, the workflow is literally drag and drop to have an SSL link attached to your clipboard. If you want further security, you can create an access-restricted URL that adds a password and expiry date to the link. You can even add link tracking, and Dropshare can randomise the file name if you don’t trust yourself to name your transfers carefully 3. You can do similar things with Dropbox and other cloud services, but that almost always requires a paid account.

The way link privacy works is Dropshare acts as a proxy, so the actual URL for the file isn’t revealed. There are a couple of things to be aware of here, first this means the file will pass through a Dropshare server to be downloaded. Dropshare doesn’t save the files or keep any logs, but you are still trusting a third party. Second, this shouldn’t be confused with encrypting files. If you have truly sensitive material you want to send, you need to encrypt the files separately. For a simple solution, an app like MacPaw’s free Encrypto can do that for you.

A Host of Other Cool Features

If a simple customisable, and private workflow isn’t enough, Dropshare has a number of other nice features. Like CloudApp and Droplr, there are tools for capturing screenshots and video on the fly. You can do the same with text by composing a note directly, or better still use the builtin Markdown translator to post an HTML document that can be opened in the browser from the link itself. Setup a custom landing page, shorten URLs, or mirror an iOS device. It even has a command line tool. The list goes on.

Where to Get DropShare

Dropshare is yet another gem that comes with a Setapp subscription, or you can pick it up direct for 24,99€. An full featured iOS version is also available.

  1. Based in Germany, a decent choice given Germany’s privacy laws
  2. The one caveat is B2 limits downloads to 1Gb per day. Anything over that will cost the princly sum of $0.01 per GB. That’s right, one cent.
  3. The file name is revealed even in a restricted link

Notebooks Among the Excellent Apps in Back to School Sale

best productivity apps for iPhone iPad and Mac

The annual back to school sale from European Independent developer collective, 12★apps, has a few days to run. If you haven’t heard of 12 Star Apps, it is a promotional initiative by a group of European developers who make some of the best productivity apps for iPhone, iPad, and Mac. They run promotions at specific times throughout the year where each developer offers a discount of up to 80% for their apps.

The collection includes some of the best apps I know of for study or research. Among the highlights are the excellent research notebook Findings, flash card revision app Studies, and what I consider to be the best digital mind-mapping tool, MindNode. You can also pick up a copy of Prizmo, which has long been one of the most powerful and accurate OCR scanners on any platform, including iOS where Prizmo Go is the tool I use to automate capture of book sections and other research material.

All of the above are excellent apps, with generous discounts, but the title in the collection that truly stands out for me is the wonderful note-taking, document management and productivity powerhouse Notebooks, by Alfons Schmid. I have written about Notebooks a couple of times on this site, and I have some more content on the way. I recently posted a workflow for creating reading lists on iOS, and after corresponding with the developer I am excited for the app’s future.

During the Back to School Promotion, Notebooks is available from the App Store on iOS for $US3.99, and macOS for $US8.99. Trust me, these are absurdly low prices for such a powerful piece of software. If you do decide to pick up a copy, check back here over the next couple of weeks as I post a few tips on how to get the most out of it.

The list of other apps and their respective discounts can be found at the 12★apps site.

Focus Sounds: Instrumental Music for Focus

Read enough of my posts and you might start to pick up on the little jokes I make here and there about attention madness. Music is always helpful, but finding the right music can be part of the problem if you’re not careful. This is one area I get value from Apple Music. Between curated playlists,  and curious browsing I have discovered, and rediscovered some of my favourite music for concentrating. With that in mind, this is the first of what I hope will be regular posts recommending Artists, albums and playlists of instrumental music for focus, and concentration.

Instrumental Music for Focus

Instrumental Music For Focus
Nils Frahm and F.S Blumm's neo classical minimalism is perfect concentration music.

This week’s album is Tag Eins Tag Zwei By F.S. Blumm, Nils Frahm, a collaboration between two brilliant instrumentalists. Nils Frahm is one of my favourite contemporary composers, and F. S. Blumm is the pseudonym of german artist Frank Schültge, a musician worth exploring in his own right. This is a collectors item on vinyl, with only 450 copies ever pressed. The album is a kind of minimalist conversation between Frahm's singular piano style, and subtle responsive guitar from F.S Blumm.  It almost does it a disservice to consider this background music, at the same time it has the kind of cadence and space I find perfect for writing. You will know immediately if it's for you.

You can pick it up on Apple MusicSpotify, or Amazon. Or head over the Sonic Peices Bandcamp page if you want to buy it outright, or explore more of their music.

 

A Brief Note On Apple Music vs Spotify

Initially, it was touch and whether I would hang on to Apple Music after the initial 3 month trial. However, the 50% student discount was enough to persuade me, and it also means I can hang on to years of meticulously maintained iTunes Match data. It is fair the say the service has improved significantly. That said, I also have access to Spotify via my mobile carrier, and in my experience it still has a superior discovery algorithm.  The distinction I would make between the two services is this. If you want  curated discovery, and you have mainly Apple devices,  then use Apple Music. If you want more automated discovery, and you want to connect your music beyond the Apple sandbox, go with Spotify. Either way, if you're a student you get a discount on both.

Happy reading and writing.

 

Quick Fix: Mount Encrypted APFS Drive with AppleScript

automatically unlock an APFS volume with AppleScript

To supplement last week’s post on automatically mounting an external drive to create a clone, here is a quick tip for doing the same thing with an encrypted APFS volume. Ideally, you should be encrypting your backups. If you’re running macOS 10.13 High Sierra, or the impending macOS Mojave, then you will be cloning your system to an APFS volume. If that’s the case, you’ll need to no how to automatically unlock APFS volume with AppleScript.

Automatically unlock APFS volume with AppleScript

There is a little more work involved here, but none of it difficult. The file system might be new, but diskutil is still the command line program doing all the work managing volumes. There is simply a couple more commands involved. This assumes you have already encrypted the drive with Disk Utility.

To mount, or rather unlock an encrypted APFS volume with AppleScript, we need the following information:

  • APFS volume ID
  • Cryptographic user ID
  • The encryption password

The password is the same one you used when you formatted the drive. Here is how to get the other two pieces of the puzzle.

  1. Find the APFS volume ID for your clone drive. You can see this information clearly in Disk Utility. For every volume listed there is a table of information, the device field has what you are looking for. It is some variation of disk1s1. Or if you prefer, with the drive already mounted you can run a terminal command to have the information of all your drives listed, like so:

diskutil apfs list

That command will take a moment, then print a whole lot of information to screen like below. Look for volume you intend to clone your system to and note down the APFS Volume Disk.

Automatically Unlock Apfs Volume With Applescript
You can find the APFS volume ID in a couple of places, if you know where to look
  1. Once you have the volume ID.  In the terminal run the following command (replace ‘apfs_volume_id’ with your disk)

diskutil apfs listcryptousers /dev/apfs_volume_id

You will get something that looks like this:

+-- B4BA200D-B0B7-4AB2-A48C-BDE9FFA7E3BA
	Type: Disk User
	Hint: 1pw

That long alphanumeric code is the Cryptographic user. Copy that code and you have everything you need to make your AppleScript work.

  1. Create the AppleScript to automatically mount your encrypted APFS volume. The script looks like this:
do shell script "diskutil apfs unlockVolume [name_of_your_drive] -user B4BA200D-B0B7-4AB2-A48C-BDE9FFA7E3BA -passphrase [enter your passphrase here]" 

Naturally, you will enter the name of your drive, and replace the user code with the one you copied above. Make sure you remove the square brackets.

  1. Find a way to launch the script when you need it. There are a bunch of options in my previous post. My preferred option is currently Keyboard Maestro, but an Automator Calendar Alarm, or Lingon X work just as well.

Congratulations, you can automatically unlock an APFS volume with AppleScript.

 

Photo by Patrick Lindenberg on Unsplash

Affinity Designer Release: Professional Graphic Design for iPad

Professional Graphic Design for iPad

One of the best design tools you will find on macOS has just been released on iPad. When the iPad Pro line was updated last year, one of the most significant software developments was the excellent desktop class photo editing app Affinity Photo.  It's been on my list of best apps ever since. The follow up to that release, Serif's  Affinity Designer means professional graphic design for iPad. If you're looking for a desktop class design app for iPad this is worth a look.

Design tools rarely make sense to me on the desktop. I have never quite grokked Adobe’s PhotoShop, or Illustrator. For my modest design needs I muddle through best as I can, but I undoubtedly prefer more accessible software. Flying Meat’s Acorn opened my eyes to powerful simplicity, then being able to move between devices made Pixelmator my app of choice. The recently released Pixelmator Pro is a worthy addition to any design toolset, but it has left the iPad version languishing behind . The lack of relative feature parity betweens apps on Mac and iPad remains a stubborn barrier to realisation of the tablet’s potential.  We still see a lot of minimal, companion style versions of Mac apps on iOS. With the direction of development, ironically, Apple's forthcoming cross platform UIKit Framework 1 says more about macOS at this point.

Something that is clear, however, is the iPad simply makes sense as a design interface. Direct and tactile manipulation of images removes a layer of abstraction and — at least in my experience — makes it easier to learn the required interactions. At the moment, Serif is relatively unusual among developers for their treatment of iOS as a serious professional platform equal to macOS.  In the design space, the Affinity is suite is currently peerless as a result.

Professional Graphic Design for iPad

Professional Graphic Design for iPad

Designer is a whole new level for graphic design software on iOS. From sketching, to fully realised vector tools and UI design, with everything in between. Even with modest needs, having access to such an intuitive professional app makes learning faster and more enjoyable. Graphic design software is traditionally  expensive too, and while some of the apps I have mentioned buck that trend, both Affinity apps are significantly cheaper on iOS.  Even more so while the 30% discount is available for Affinity Designer's release. This might be an aspirational purchase for me, but for somebody with actual design skills wanting to do professional work on iOS, it's a no brainer.

Affinity Designer is available on the US $13.99

  1. Marzipan

Rise of the machines: has technology evolved beyond our control? | The Guardian

This recent article from James Bridle does more to recommend him as one of the more insightful, and interesting writers on Technology at the moment. I linked to a post he wrote about disturbing algorithmic content on Youtube. I'm glad to a writer like this finding a platform to ask important questions in an accessible way.

Something strange has happened to our way of thinking – and as a result, even stranger things are happening to the world. We have come to believe that everything is computable and can be resolved by the application of new technologies. But these technologies are not neutral facilitators: they embody our politics and biases, they extend beyond the boundaries of nations and legal jurisdictions and increasingly exceed the understanding of even their creators. As a result, we understand less and less about the world as these powerful technologies assume more control over our everyday lives.

Between technological evangelism, and equally religious devotees, the more important dissenting voices and thoughtful critique become. Which is why I recommend picking up a copy of Bridle forthcoming book New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future

Find it on Book Depository or Amazon

Automatically Mount External Drive to Clone a Mac

Simple Mac Automator Example

I know some people find automation daunting. Fortunately, some of the most effective Mac automations are simple enough to get anybody started. The native MacOS automator app alone can save you from boring and repetitive tasks. Better still, Mac automation can save you from having to remember those tasks. A good example of a simple automation is how to automatically mount an external drive to create a bootable clone for backup.

Backup Strategies for macOS

The past 18 months we’ve had some hardware failures that took me from feeling over-prepared to being relieved I have this all set up. A solid backup and recovery scheme is table stakes for most nerds, but in my experience the same can’t be said of academics. To say nothing of the way most students wing it with their data. I’ve lost count of the horror stories I’m privy to. Undergrads losing devices, or having them pinched. Graduate students having to ask supervisors for a copy of their own thesis, or recompile dissertations from draft fragments. My backup strategy looks like this:

  1. Regular time machine backups to an external drive on my Synology rt2600ac router. Setting up Time Machine to backup wirelessly is an overlooked example of Mac automation
  2. Continuous offsite backup of everything to Backblaze. For US$5 a month, I have almost 6 terabytes of files backed up.
  3. An automated, bootable clone of my entire system updated every night using SuperDuper!

If you have a solid backup strategy, regularly creating bootable clones of your whole system drive is no doubt part of it. If it isn’t, it should be.

Automatically Mounting an External Hard Drive

One of the problems with automating the creation of a bootable clone is the drive must be mounted. That might seem like I’m stating the bleeding obvious, or overlooking an obvious solution, but keeping a clone of your system mounted at all times can create all kinds of problems. Once the drive is indexed, you can have issues with document conflicts, messed up caching, and all manner of application weirdness. It doesn’t take much to launch the wrong version of an app, then you’re in a world of hurt.

The answer, of course, is to automatically mount the drive before backup, and eject it afterwards. But how to do that? Ejecting the drive is the easy part. Any decent backup, cloning app will have this functionality. This includes apps like Chronosync, Carbon Copy Cloner, or if you’re a Setapp user, Backup Pro. My favourite drive cloning software for Mac is Super Duper! for its elegant simplicity. Using Super Duper! to automatically eject the drive looks like this:

Automatically Mount External Drive
Any decent macOS backup utility will have the ability to automatically eject an external drive aftre creating a bootable clone

But, we are putting the cart in front of the horse. The question remains, how to automatically mount the drive. Thankfully, that is also simple. We can use a single command in AppleScript.

One Line AppleScript  to Automatically Mount External Drive

A simple one line AppleScript to make a Mac automatically mount an external drive looks like this:

do shell script "diskutil mount clone"

To make it work you either name your drive ‘clone, or edit the script where it says ’clone’ with the name of the target volume. All that’s left is how to trigger the script. The more you start to peel back the layers on Mac automation, the more you realise how many different options there are. Here are three ways to run the above AppleScript, and automate the mounting of an external drive.

Automatically Mount External Drive with Automator Calendar Alarm

 

The first option is to use Automator, the native Mac app. Automator can utilise the Mac Calendar app to trigger simple MacOS automations with an alarm. Here's how to setup an Automator Calendar Alarm.

  1. Open Automator from your applications
  2. Choose Calendar Alarm
  3. Search the actions on the left for ‘Run AppleScript’ and drag that action across to the workflow editor on the right — or double click
  4. Clear the window and past our single line of AppleScript into the ‘Run AppleScript’ window. Here is that line of code again:

do shell script "diskutil mount clone"

Simple macOS automation using one line of AppleScript
  1. Click on the little hammer icon to compile the script, then save the workflow and give it a name.
  2. As soon as you save the workflow it will open the calendar app with a new entry. All you need to do is move it, and schedule it like you would any other event.
Automatically Mount External Drive
Automator can trigger an alarm in the native Calendar App to automatically mount an external drive
  1. You’re done, have yourself a Pixie Caramel

There is amore convoluted way to do this from the calendar itself, but the result is the same. I recommend building the workflow yourself, simple as it is. But if you’d rather, you can download a copy here

Automatically Mount External Drive with Keyboard Maestro

I would be happy using the Automator workflow above if I didn’t already use Keyboard Maestro. Setting up Keyboard Maestro to trigger the script is easier still. It’s not the kind of thing I suggest you purchase the app for, but the kind of simple use case it is often overlooked for.

 

Keyboard Maestro Macro

Automate AppleScript Launch with Lingon X

Another option is to use Lingon X, a powerful automation utility that can launch practically anything. Lingon X is ideal for a job like this. To use Lingon you ned to save the script itself first.

  1. Launch the native Mac Script Editor from Utiities
  2. Paste the AppleScript into the editor do shell script "diskutil mount clone"
  3. Compile with the little hammer
  4. Save the script
  5. Schedule a new job in Lingon X to run the script before your clone is set to run.
simple macOS automation
Lingon X is a powerful utility for creating simple macOS automation

There is also an App Store version for Lingon available.

Choosing an External Hard Drive for Bootable Clone

The last word on this is doubled edged. You should of course try to be savvy about the external hard drives you buy, but this workflow wouldn’t exist if you could be certain you’ll never buy a lemon. I mentioned in my post on replacing the Apple Airport Extreme that Backblaze keep excellent drive statistics. Understandably, it doesn’t include the kind of portable external hard drives you will likely use for this kind of automated clone backup. I feel well covered with my setup, but I know plenty of people who like to rotate the drives and keep one offsite. Either way, I have always found Seagate Expansion drives to be fast, and reliable. Connected to a Hub, and stashed under the desk to avoid more clutter.

 

Synology RT2600ac Router as an Apple Airport Replacement

Apple Airport Replacement

You might have heard the news that Apple discontinued their Airport Router line recently. For a time Airport routers had distinct advantages in usability, and wireless Time Machine backups were once like magic. But now, Apple would have to build something an order of magnitude better than the last remaining Airport devices to compete with the likes of Synology. If you are looking for an alternative to Apple Airport Extreme, or Time Capsule, I recommend taking a look at Synology’s routers. This covers my experience replacing an Airport Extreme with the Synology RT2600ac.

Synology RT2600ac: Best Non Mesh Router?

Mesh Wifi is all the rage. While commercial mesh wifi has been around for some time, it is only in the past couple of years consumer tech has started to benefit. Mesh products have flooded the market, and savvy product placement has made the likes of Eero, and Netgear’s Orbi coveted home networking solutions. But, as much as mesh has become more accessible, it remains relatively expensive, and it isn’t always necessary. For a modest sized property, a decent stand alone router might even be a better option. Such is the situation I’m in. Knowing I don’t need mesh, I wanted to buy the best stand alone router I could find for non mesh wifi.

Having gone with the Synology RT2600ac, I couldn’t be happier. I have never owned — or even used — a router even half as good as this thing. I’m no networking expert 1, but I know my way around the awful browser-based interfaces generic routers ship with. Where Apple Airport routers offered sharp relief from the abominable user experience of those devices, Synology routers go much further. Both the RT2600ac, and the RT1900ac, benefit from Synology’s pedigree as a network storage provider. Which means you don’t just get an excellent, easy to use stand alone router, but also a mature ecosystem of app packages to extend its functionality.

alternative to Apple Airport Extreme
A number of packages are available to make Synology routers more an upgrade than just an alternative to Apple Airport Extreme

Inexpensive Network Attached Storage

I wanted a network storage solution, but dropping more cash on a NAS drive at the same time wasn’t an option. The fact that Synology routers can double as a lightweight NAS is the big bonus for me. Synology Router Manager (SRM) has a number of features ported from Synology Disk Manager, including a package manager. If you attach a USB drive, or a high capacity SD Card, you can install and manage packages that include a VPN server, download manager, media server, and Cloud Station Server. Setting up a personal, private cloud is simple and it works very well.

Alternative To Apple Airport Extreme
Cloud Station Server adds private cloud storage capabilities to Synology routers

Time Machine

Wireless Time Machine backups were the killer feature of Apple networking. That was obviously the purpose of the Time Capsule base station, but the Airport Extreme could do it too. Having Time Machine on the network was extremely convenient, but the network storage capabilities are about as limited as it gets. Sure, you could set up file sharing, but it wasn't great in my experience. By contrast both Synology models can do much more with a drive, or two attached. Time Machine is where it starts, rather than where it ends. This is just one reason that a Synology router is less an alternative to Apple Airport Extreme, and more an upgrade.

Quick Connect and Dynamic DNS Support

This is also huge, Synology even provide their own free service for dealing with dynamic IP addresses. I am in favour of cutting back third-party services wherever possible. This might be stretching the definition, but it means no more janky DNS updaters, or scripts to make my network accessible. Synology makes securing devices with SLL more user friendly than it normally is, and their Quick Connect service helps mitigate common problems with port forwarding and so on. All of which means I'm now living the dream of reliable external Plex access. It would be ideal for gamers who want to get on with things without becoming network engineers.

VPN Server

Synology routers support both inbound and outbound VPN connections. A common use for a private VPN is securing your traffic while using public Wifi. Synology routers have a simple, user friendly package called VPN Plus Server that will allow you to use your home network no matter where you are. SRM also makes it easy to connect your entire network to a VPN, if that is something you need. I use NordVPN

Wifi Coverage

Suggesting ‘your mileage may vary’ is more relevant than ever here, but the Wifi coverage I get from the Synology RT2600ac is so good that setting up a mesh system would go be overkill for me. Our place is pretty compact, but we have close neighbours for interference, and a long driveway. Yet I can walk out the gate before I’m kicked off the wifi, and there is nowhere inside our place the connection is not consistent.

My admittedly unscientific tests include walking to the other side of our garage, which would make me roughly 30 metres from the house with two brick walls, double glazing and a car between the Synology RT2600ac and my iPhone. I still get 50% of the downstream bandwidth, and everything available going up.

Bonus Tip: Best External Hard Drives for a Synology Router?

Best External Hard DriveThis will depend, either on how much you’re willing and able to spend, or on what your goal for the network attached storage. If you’re looking for an Apple Airport Replacement, you will obviously want a decent drum of storage. The good news is this needn’t be an expensive exercise. I use Backblaze for peace of mind off-site backup. They have always been excellent, so I have every reason to trust their data and recommendations. Every year they publish a list of Hard Drive statistics. It’s a handy guide that can help you avoid buying lemons to put your data on. After pouring through the tables, I ended up getting a 4TB Western Digital Drive.

If you like the idea of setting up the NAS capabilities of the Synology RT2600ac, one thing to be aware of is redundancy. Genuine NAS drives are configured in RAID arrays, with redundancy built in. You can get decent stand alone RAID drives from the likes of Western Digital, but do the math an you might as well look at the lower end Synology boxes. Luckily, another great feature that Synology router’s can tap into is cloud backup. Again, I use Backblaze for this, utilising their low cost B2 storage with Synology’s Cloud Station Backup. The way I see it, if a drive fails I’m covered, and with any luck that won’t happen before I’m in a position to upgrade to a full blown disk station NAS.

Alternative to Apple Airport Extreme

Apple recently published a Support article with information for a Wi-Fi router to use with Apple devices. Some of what it contains is best practice advice, so they’ve been a little loose with the meaning of ‘essential’. Nonetheless, if your looking to tick all those boxes the Synology RT2600ac will do that for you. So will the earlier model, the RT1900ac for that matter. I have very rarely been so happy with a piece of hardware, and never ever felt compelled to write about a router before.

  1. in a former life — for my sins — I was a software installation engineer

Using Unclutter as macOS Screen Shot Manager

Unclutter Screenshot Manager Macos

Unclutter is a unique take on a drag and drop shelf app that includes a scratch pad, and simple clipboard manager. I have used Unclutter for some time as a shelf for holding transit items. It helps me avoid dumping loads of junk on my desktop. Unclutter a little different to Yoink or Dropshelf in that the shelf pulls down like a curtain from the top of the screen, but the concept is much the same. The notepad and clipboard manager make Unclutter a useful utility for anybody, but I have found a specific use case for it as a macOS screen shot manager.

For a while I used a handy little menu bar app call Shotty to manage screenshots. Unfortunately, Shotty’s user interface is small, so I find it isn’t ideal on the big screen of an iMac. The difference, depending on how you set it up, is Unclutter can stretch the whole way across the top of your screen. The display options can be set so that screen shots will display in an ad hoc gallery, making it easier to work with the images as you write.

macOS Screen Shot Manager
Unclutter can present screenshots in a gallery across the top of your screen

Setting up Unclutter

If you want to set Unclutter up to manage your screenshots, first you need to set the storage location in Unclutter. You can leave it as the default if you prefer, and use that file path for your set up. Otherwise you can set it to a cloud storage location, which is especially handy if you work across more than one Mac, or you want to access your screenshots on iOS.

Managing Screen Shots with Unclutter
Set the storage location for your screen shots in the Unclutter preferences.

Once you know the file path for files in Unclutter, you need to make sure your screenshots are going to end up there automatically. There are a couple of simple ways to do that.

Changing the Default Screen Shot Folder in Terminal

The first option is to change the default location for screenshots via terminal. Open a Terminal window and enter the following, then press enter. Obviously, you will change the file path to match where your Unclutter files are, or you can copy and paste if you have it setup with DropBox.

defaults write com.apple.screencapture location ~/Dropbox/Unclutter/Unlcutter files

Once you have set the location, you have to run the following command to reset the process that manages screen shots in macOS.

killall SystemUIServer

If you want to change back to having screen shots land on your desktop, run the above commands again but change the location back to /Desktop

Managing Screen Shots with Unclutter and Hazel

Unclutter Screen Shot Manager
Using Hazel to move screen shots means more control than changing the global setting in terminal

I prefer to set up a Hazel rule for this for a few different reasons. First, it makes it easier to switch it on and off if necessary, or if I want to change the location. The second reason has a touch of irony given the apps name is Unclutter, it is easy to accumulate a lot of old screenshots. They’re not as readily visible as on the desktop, so having Hazel come in and clean them up is helpful.

There are more tricks here if you need them too. If you want to archive particular shots and delete others you can add conditional tags with hazel, or even go by the name. My workflow for uploading shots to WordPress from my Mac includes using quicklook to rename files with a Text Expander snippet. Once they are renamed, Hazel will grab them again and run an Automator action that prepares them for this site.

Setapp Unclutter App
Using Unclutter to manage screenshots makes it easier to use Quicklook for viewing and renaming files

Unclutter on Setapp or the Mac App Store

MacPaw describes the Setapp platform as the Netflix for Mac apps, the analogy almost works. It’s unlikely you haven’t heard of it yet, but I have written about it a few times. There are numerous useful utilities, like Unclutter, included with a subscription. They add a lot of value to the heavy hitters like Ulysses, 2Do, and Marked. They have well over 100 apps now, and with the education discount a subscription will cost you five bucks a month.

Unclutter is also available on its own from the App Store for US$9.99